The city’s elected officials in Albany want to establish a regulatory framework that would prevent detained immigrants from having to pay exorbitant fees, including upwards of $400 a month for the privilege of wearing an ankle monitor.
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Congressional and state seats have changed. Before this summer’s primary elections, find out how your old districts stack up with your new ones.
Albany lawmakers are poised to approve a long-sought Preservation Trust to enable new investment in dilapidated housing projects — and Mayor Eric Adams says residents will have a say. The fine print is less clear.
With the Adams admin pushing homeless sweeps and canceling at least three shelters the pro-homeless volunteers are ramping up efforts to help other New Yorkers welcome struggling people rather than shoo them away.
A Brooklyn mother’s search for a Lakota instructor leads her to the Language Conservancy, an organization teaching Native languages even after being condemned by the Sioux Nation’s leading council earlier this month.
After Benjamin’s arrest by the feds and resignation, here’s what you need to know about the 2022 race for the state’s second-highest office.
A similar law was recently struck down in California — and even if Gov. Kathy Hochul’s proposal passes and survives court challenges, other gun loopholes abound.
Five months after the city Department of Investigation suggested 13 ways to clean up the Parks Department’s Lifeguard Division, none of them have been fully acted upon as beach season is upon us.
Toby Stavisky in Queens and Gustavo Rivera in The Bronx have both seen their districts altered dramatically in a new court-ordered political map. But one of them has two apartments to choose from — and already lives in the one that’s outside her district.
Families still don’t know when school starts in September, and thousands of students don’t know which high school they will attend.
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Only 64% of riders adequately covered their faces on subways in mid-April, according to the latest data from the MTA, the lowest compliance rate since the agency began tracking in 2020.
Past political fundraising and an ill-fated campaign for president have left New York City’s former mayor with a mountain of unpaid debts — and a trail of loyal donors who have profited from their dealings with City Hall
Pointing to higher-than-predicted tax revenues, the city’s chief fiscal officer will urge the mayor and City Council to adopt a savings formula to ensure funds to weather recessions.
The Department of Environmental Protection has floated the biggest rate hike since 2014. The public is invited to weigh in two days this week.
Major changes have come to the state’s political lines ahead of a double primary season this summer.
The city added 25,000 jobs in April, with a boost from resurgent tourism — but growth remains at half the national rate, while unemployment remains nearly double.
Permits are surging during the final days of the 421-a program, which relieves landlords of $1.8 billion a year they say they need to build new housing. Reformers urge a new approach.
MTA
Citing THE CITY’s report on how subway stations become drug use sites when centers close, the mayor called the situation a crisis that can’t wait. But center operators say they need more funding.
A fifth person this year died behind bars at Rikers Island on Wednesday morning — the first woman in three years — just hours after officials announced they were overhauling their last overhaul.