Only one of the three Democrats and four Republicans running to run the state actually lives in New York City, but all of them have agendas that would affect the five boroughs.
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Echoing the Amazon HQ2 fight, state senators demand a say in Midtown Manhattan redevelopment and hunt for details on vague finances.
Bushwick’s Erik Dilan is benefiting from a blitz of literature trashing progressive Samir Nemir-Olivares, who champions an anti-eviction bill and could become New York’s first genderqueer state lawmaker.
Congressional and state seats have changed. Before the 2022 summer primary elections, find out who’s running and how your old districts stack up with your new ones.
In the first five months of this year, there have been 449 reported incidents of people riding on top of or outside trains, data shows — which is already almost as many as all of 2019.
Displacement is “demoralizing” says one teacher departing from a Brooklyn middle school. On Friday, City Council members grilled education officials about why they’re shrinking needed resources.
From laws shielding abortion providers from extradition, arrest and malpractice suits to increased funding and security for clinics, Albany and City Hall made it clear that New York will remain a safe haven.
An annual check turned up 10 self-closing doors that didn’t work at Twin Parks Northwest apartments managed by Reliant Realty Services — including one at the building in which 17 tenants died in January.
Turnstile data analyzed by THE CITY from all 472 stations shows that ridership at three Queens stops along the No. 7 line is currently at more than 65% of 2019 levels, among the highest in the entire subway system.
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In the wake of the Supreme Court decision striking down New York’s concealed carry law, the City Council is exploring one option: a law that would declare any area with more than 10,000 people per square mile a “sensitive location.”
After THE CITY and ProPublica exposed a dramatic drop in beds at state psychiatric hospitals, New York’s top law enforcer takes agonized testimony from patients and providers — and the parent who’d told us of her son’s monthslong wait for care.
The CDC now recommends vaccination for all children 6 months and older. City parents have been frustrated with wait times, but vaccines should be available through one of 10 vaccine hubs, their pediatrician or some major pharmacies.
Economic leaders are grappling toward breakthrough ideas for how to reboot the city for a post-pandemic world. An Adams-Hochul panel promises concrete plans by October.
New York’s plan to shut down Rikers includes a mandate to flip all unused jail buildings back to the Department of Citywide Administrative Services. But the Department of Correction isn’t giving up a facility it just closed, despite a looming deadline.
Mayor refiles five years of financial disclosures after THE CITY found he’d never divested. And he still owns the Prospect Place co-op.
Tenants jeer jump in regulated rents — which landlords say is necessary to counter inflation but still doesn’t cover rising costs.
Mayor’s look at rule changes comes after THE CITY highlighted a newly enforced rule that prevents municipal workers from moonlighting — and two drownings on Rockaway Beach.
With an eye on AOC’s historic upset win four years ago, candidates challenging the Queens and Bronx establishment are looking for an edge in what’s expected to be another low-turnout primary.
A viral post of dilapidated pillars near the George Washington Bridge got New Yorkers wondering: How do you “say something” when you see iffy-looking infrastructure?