Worker Safety

Most of the battery-related fires take place in working-class residential neighborhoods in Queens, Brooklyn and The Bronx.
The inspection report, obtained by THE CITY, also found other violations including old food residue on surfaces like a matcha stirrer and a cappuccino nozzle.
New York City requires 40 hours of OSHA-certified training for workers on building and demolition jobs. The few free classes available are now overwhelmed.
E-bikes have become an essential tool workers use to meet brutal delivery schedules. They’ve also sparked deadly fires in public housing.
The areas around the West 4th Street, Times Square-42nd Street and 125th Street stations on the Lexington Avenue line had the highest number of “track intrusions,” which are up 20% since before the pandemic.
Smoke and gases from smoldering wires can send manhole covers flying — and the results can be disastrous.
Blaming “multiple failures” when it comes to worker protection, Ty Jeter recounted how she feared for her life when her cab door was kicked in on a southbound No. 6 train.
Only workers who aren’t fully vaccinated are notified of positive cases in their office. Municipal staffers say safety hazards and double standards abound.
Plea deal for Paul Bailey in the 2018 Sunset Park worksite death of Luis Sánchez Almonte aims to get a felony rap dismissed. A contractor and foreperson still face charges after allegedly ignoring OSHA violations for dangerous conditions.
Six Chinese phlebotomists employed by BioReference Laboratories are alleging years of unequal pay and work conditions. They’ve filed complaints with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission while preparing a lawsuit.
At least two drivers have been denied injured-on-the-job claims because one was on a coffee break when he saved an elderly couple from a mugger and the other had just stepped off a bus before a maskless passenger hit him.
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Family and friends will complete Garrett Goble’s final Brooklyn-to-The Bronx subway run on March 27, a year to the day he died in an train fire in Manhattan. “He didn’t die in vain,” one coworker said.
A Sanitation garage in Brooklyn and Flushing Meadows Corona Park locker room are among recent virus breakout sites. Union officials are calling for shots for thousands more municipal employees: “We can’t work from home.”
At the height of the pandemic, the city issued $1.4 billion in emergency, no-bid contracts for crucial medical equipment — and got the wrong masks and lost track of deliveries, records show. “Stop this s—t!” one bureaucrat cried during an online meeting.
THE CITY’s Open Newsroom team breaks down some of the latest info about working in NYC during the pandemic. Sign up for our new jobs newsletter to get updates.
Some labor experts fear that keeping employees safe, especially nonunion workers, in the era of coronavirus will be difficult without more proactive government oversight.
The arrest of a deliverer in Manhattan Thursday night underscored the fears of encounters with cops and protests that keep some cyclists and drivers sidelined.
Taxpayers are on the hook for $170,000 for after-hours cleaning and maintenance, even after most courthouses closed and hearings moved to video.
The de Blasio administration’s shift from homeless shelters to isolation hotels for people with COVID-19 leaves storage and moving staff largely unprotected from coronavirus, union officials say.