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Women With Children Having Harder Time Re-entering NYC Workforce

A new study shows 41% of women living with kids in NYC are not working compared to 24% of men with children — a lingering effect of remote school and a perpetual child care challenge.

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Jobs Grow — Along With the Pandemic Gap Between Rich and Poor New Yorkers

The city gained 83,500 jobs in October, the biggest increase in months, as COVID infection rates dropped. But new reports show New York remains one of the most unequal cities in the nation, with the one percent accounting for a rising share of income.

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Court Blocks Controversial Medicare Switch for Retired NYC Workers

A judge’s decision delays the Oct. 31 deadline for former city employees to decide whether they want to move to private Medicare Advantage or pay for alternatives.

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Retirees Flee City Medicare Program as Deadline Looms for Move to Private Health Plan

Uncertainty about coverage and costs under Medicare Advantage has a quarter million former city workers on edge. Two lawsuits seeking to block the move are slated to be heard in court Wednesday.

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MTA Gets Rolling With Hiring Spree But Impact on Commute May Be Slow Going

Transit officials are starting to chip away at a worker shortage that has for months caused tens of thousands of bus and subway trips to be canceled or delayed, frustrating passengers. Meanwhile, overtime is rising for bus and subway workers.

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Sen. Chuck Schumer Aims to Deliver Infrastructure Dollars to Help Food Couriers

During a ride-along with the labor group Los Deliveristas Unidos in Harlem Wednesday, the Senate majority leader announced he’d like to assign funds from the $1 trillion infrastructure bill to build rest area kiosks for food-app cyclists and drivers.

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NYC Set to Pass Food Delivery App Laws Securing Workers Minimum Pay, Bathrooms and More

De Blasio supports first-in-the-nation bills scheduled for Thursday vote, seeking better working conditions in the booming tech-driven food courier economy. The City Council’s actions come as app firms sue to block bills it passed previously.

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NYC Food Delivery Workers Face Paltry Pay and High Risks, Analysis Shows

The city’s 65,000 app-based food delivery couriers earn an average of $7.87 an hour before tips — propping up a multi-billion dollar tech industry that relies on young immigrant workers who deal with robberies, crashes and worse on city streets.

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Commercial Districts Grapple With Slowed Return to Business as Usual

Flatiron, Hudson Square, Downtown Brooklyn and the Garment District offer four studies in survival, with just 23% of Manhattan office workers back at their desks. Lures back include pedestrian space and cultural events.

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More Than 1.6 Million New Yorkers Will Lose Unemployment Benefits by Labor Day

On Sept. 5, several federally funded programs that had expanded unemployment benefits during the pandemic will expire. Are you affected? Here’s some information you’ll need to know.

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Inside Cuomo’s ‘Hotel California’ for Albany Aides: You Can Never Leave

As the governor fought sexual harassment allegations, some former employees who went to the private sector still worked privately for him — reportedly helping craft media strategies and discredit some of his accusers. Here’s why.

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Weren’t Eligible for Unemployment Benefits? Apply for the Excluded Workers Fund

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and lawmakers in Albany created the historic $2.1 billion fund to assist undocumented and nontraditional workers. Here’s what you need to do to apply.

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CUNY Community College Students Need Help Covering Big Costs to Get Back to Class, Study Says

The Center for an Urban Future finds most two-year school students drop out before getting their degrees. A program called ASAP that helps them across the finish line is facing city budget cuts as New York emerges from the pandemic.

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De Blasio’s Pandemic Heroes Parade Could Use a Clear Invite List ‘Honorees’ Say

With just over two weeks until City Hall’s "Canyon of Heroes" salute to essential workers, many essential workers say they’re still unclear on their place in the parade.

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Slow Rebound of Construction Jobs Threatens NYC Post-Pandemic Rebuild

The latest employment numbers are 25,000 below the city’s pre-coronavirus peak. With uncertainty over everything from the next mayor to Gov. Cuomo’s political fate, the industry is betting nearly all on President Biden’s $1 trillion infrastructure push.

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Big Tech-Backed Gig Worker Union Bill Fails to Get in Gear in Albany

As an industry-supported proposal to allow gig workers some union rights dies in Albany, efforts to regulate food app delivery companies ratchet up in the City Council.

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Support for Gig Worker Union Bill in New York Collapsing After Scrutiny

Groups representing app-based drivers and delivery workers came out against a proposal that would pave the way for their right to join a union in New York, but with few rights. The Transport Workers Union, which initially supported the draft bill, yanked its support on Tuesday.

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Jobs Making a Careful Comeback as NYC Reopens

The city gained 35,000 positions last month with restaurants and the arts showing signs of resurgence. Hopes raised by the easing of most restrictions this week are tempered by an 11% unemployment rate.

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Gig Workers Inch Toward Right to Unionize in New York — But There’s a Catch

Lawmakers, labor unions and tech companies are nearing a deal on a bill to allow workers for Uber, DoorDash and other app-based outfits to unionize. But they still wouldn’t be considered employees.

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Why Are Some NYC Restaurants Struggling to Find Workers? It’s Complicated…

Some owners believe that pandemic unemployment benefits are keeping people out of the workforce. But economists and worker advocates say multiple factors — including child care, low wages and COVID-changed perspectives — are at play.