Weather

Cross Bay Boulevard, a main evacuation route for residents of Broad Channel, is still in bad shape a decade after Superstorm Sandy.
MTA
Ten years after the superstorm of the century, the MTA isn’t done with efforts to protect its waterfront routes.
With roots in Occupy Wall Street, the spontaneous relief effort showcased how mutual aid groups can step into the breach when traditional organizations are slow to act.
The moon helped spare some vulnerable coastal areas in 2012, and they’re still struggling to get attention and funding a decade later.
Nearing the 10th anniversary of deadly Superstorm Sandy, the city comptroller examines how much federal money various agencies have spent on rebuilding and resilience.
This summer, 725 people visited city emergency rooms — that’s almost 13% more than during the same period in 2021, and nearly as many as in 2018.
While the city and state are taking some steps to mitigate future flooding, victims, experts and government officials themselves say more needs to be done.
While officials work toward sewer and drain upgrades and ‘green infrastructure’ to absorb water, people in at-risk neighborhoods know they are vulnerable.
Flooded out of their homes, people who can’t find new housing — even while being helped by city agencies — illustrate the urgency of the affordable housing crisis.
The office asserts the system is broken and City Hall can help more, as it follows a century-old legal precedent and rejects payout requests for flood damage.
Experts say New Yorkers should come with specific, explicit questions and plans on what to do next.
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Between downpours of rainwater and storm surges from the ocean, the potential for future flooding near the coasts and further inland is high.
The Department of Environmental Protection has floated the biggest rate hike since 2014. The public is invited to weigh in two days this week.
One house was rebuilt, one propped up on stilts, and one given back to nature.
A low-lying neighborhood where most residents aren’t connected to the city’s sewer system is struggling to transform itself. But some experts question whether investments to keep people living in a fundamentally flood-prone area are wise.
The aid program for undocumented immigrants and other people left out of federal programs had stopped taking applications in January despite tens of millions of dollars still being available.
The future of any leftover money is unclear but advocates and some lawmakers are pushing for the creation of a permanent relief fund for undocumented folks affected by disasters.
Renters and homeowners slammed by the deadly storm face different obstacles and seek varying types of relief. But their shared experiences — including living in fear of the next storm — underscore a housing crisis exacerbated by climate change.
The deadly havoc wreaked by remnants of Hurricane Ida last month showed the weaknesses of the city’s ancient sewer system as climate change brings punishing rains. One project, beset by two decades of delays, underscores the city’s massive challenge.
City Hall would be required to create a citywide climate adaptation plan to evaluate threats that include sea-level rise and possible wildfire — as well as extreme heat, wind and rain. The measure would go beyond the post-Sandy focus on storm surge.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency has so far doled out $10 million to New Yorkers impacted by the devastating remnants of Hurricane Ida earlier this month. But many undocumented immigrants are being left out of that pool.