Voting

A crumbling expressway, the threat of rising seas and missing funding for NYCHA: the problems vexing NY-10 and how the area’s next U.S. Representative could help
The switch-up in poll sites between the two summer primaries could add to voter confusion in a low-turnout election season.
Understanding the not-so flashy — but equally as important — contests lower on your primary ballot sheet this election season.
New polling sites, what to know about absentee ballots and more redistricting drama in the Assembly (maybe).
Congressional and state seats have changed. Before the 2022 summer primary elections, find out who’s running and how your old districts stack up with your new ones.
A number of barriers contribute to the shortage of Latinos in the state legislature, including low voter turnout, difficulty fundraising, scandals and factions splintering the vote.
The Democrat controlled Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment released new district lines for the House of Representatives seats in New York late Sunday and they are predictably partisan.
After years of championing an independent commission for the redrawing of political districts, state leaders now say they are taking over the process, as a wide coalition of advocates clamor for more transparency.
The new 10-member commission was meant to wrestle control of the election map-making process from party control, but they failed again to reach a consensus.
Here’s the latest on the results, what the mayor-elect is up to now, what the heck happened with those ballot questions — and how New York’s political district lines will get drawn next year.
Voters appear to have enshrined environmental rights in the state Constitution. But early results show they may have nixed making it easier to vote and changing the redistricting process. Meanwhile, a measure to expand Civil Court cases seemed headed for an OK.
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Don’t panic! Procrastinators, we’ve got you on ballot questions, City Council races and where to bring that absentee on the final day.
Early voting ends this Sunday — Halloween — and Election Day, which is merely the final day to cast a ballot, is next Tuesday, Nov. 2. We’re answering some last-minute questions from readers about ballots.
New Yorkers will soon lock in their choices for new local leaders for mayor and more. Here’s your guide on your civic duty: key dates, getting a ballot, who’s running and New York’s — count ‘em — five ballot proposal questions.
The handful of ballot proposals being decided on Nov. 2 touch on the future of political representation in Albany, environmental rights for citizens, making it easier to vote and how New York’s civil court functions.
Eric Adams is ahead by about 15,000 in-person votes after first-ranked choice vote tabulations. But Kathryn Garcia and Maya Wiley stand to benefit greatly from 125,000 outstanding Democratic absentee ballots, our analysis found.
Can you drop off ballots for friends? Do you need postage to send in absentee ballots? And what’s the deal again with ranked choice voting? Good questions. We’ve got some answers...
You can cast your ballot for mayor and the rest of the citywide races beginning Saturday. Here’s the lowdown on everything from where to find your early voting site to how to navigate ranked choice voting.
The pandemic and last year’s racial justice protests ignited increased youth interest in local politics. Whether or not they can vote, young New Yorkers want their priorities heard this election season.
Initial ranked choice voting tabulation is expected to be quick. But Board of Election officials will have to wait for absentee and affidavit ballots in races without a romp.
With so many debates and contenders as the crucial June 22 primary approaches, how do you make sense of it all? Some experts offer tips on getting the most out of the candidate meetings.