Utilities

Electric bills were already going up in the winter, but the summer is traditionally the season when prices soar even higher. Some New Yorkers have to make the choice between staying cool and staying fed.
The Department of Environmental Protection has floated the biggest rate hike since 2014. The public is invited to weigh in two days this week.
As pets are still being jolted, city oversight of Con Edison equipment and inspects called into question. The DOT says there’s no problem, but data says otherwise.
One line will bring down dam-generated electricity from Quebec, and another will feed the city with solar, wind and hydropower-created juice from Upstate. Without them, state and city climate targets were merely a pipe dream.
Community solar subscribers are supposed to earn credits on their monthly electric bills from the energy generated from sun-powered projects, but for months, those credits haven’t been appearing.
More than 400,000 customers in the New York City area are at least two months behind on their bills. Here’s some quick info that may help if you’re one of them.
Over 411,000 local Con Ed customers owe $819 million in unpaid bills. “It’s a massive crisis,” say experts.
Twenty Bronx tenants will participate in a hot environmental experiment for the next six months.
Smoke and gases from smoldering wires can send manhole covers flying — and the results can be disastrous.
Households in New York City are seeing big spikes in what they’re being charged this month, even though many aren’t using significantly more juice. We explain why, and what you can do.
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