Tenants

Over generations, residents of the Cooper Park Houses in Brooklyn have created a blueprint for successful housing organizing.
A handful of private buildings are responsible for a vastly outsized share of heat complaints, according to a new report from the city comptroller’s office.
A lack of heat is illegal in the winter, according to city law. But tenants have to take action to push their landlord to crank up the temperature.
Three years after a 2019 overhaul was supposed to stop landlords from removing most apartments from rent stabilization, thousands are left unaccounted for.
A record of your unit’s rental history from a state housing agency is the best place to start. Here’s how to get it.
Local Law 97, passed by the City Council in 2019, puts carbon caps on all buildings bigger than 25,000 square feet. With the exact rules still in draft form, landlords are trying to figure out what they need to do now.
Housing officials say that landlords registered 38,000 vacant units so far this year, down from the 60,000 reported in 2021. Landlords are still pressing for an end to restrictions they say keep apartments offline.
Testimony and a new report highlight how rent-regulated apartments are disappearing thanks to creative combining of units. The state is weighing rule changes that aim to end the practice.
Since THE CITY’s finding that last year some 89,000 rent-stabilized units were empty, tenants and elected officials have been taking to the streets.
The number of empty regulated apartments nearly doubled between 2020 and 2021, a state memo obtained by THE CITY shows.
GOT A TIP?
We’re here to listen. Email tips@thecity.nyc or visit our tips page for other ways to share.
On Thursday, the Department of Buildings released a series of draft rules that regulate how property owners are able to comply with Local Law 97.
Eric Adams is promising transparency as his administration probes how things got so cloudy in the first place.
Renovation of an Upper West Side apartment building is the cause of disputes between longtime residents and new ownership.
Tenants jeer jump in regulated rents — which landlords say is necessary to counter inflation but still doesn’t cover rising costs.
Housing officials claim that no residents were “adversely impacted,” but one 90-year-old Holocaust survivor told THE CITY he was “in a state of panic.”
The new figures are a guide for the nine-member Rent Guidelines Board before they make a preliminary recommendation in May, then a final vote on rent guidelines in June.
The Rent Guidelines Board kept rent increases historically low during the de Blasio administration. The board must vote on rent prices by July 1, and Mayor Eric Adams’ recent appointees are worrying tenant advocates.
More than 10% of people matched with a publicly funded attorney for housing cases made above the income limit once set for who could get a free lawyer. Advocates say it points to a need for free legal help beyond just the city’s poorest.
The backlog is thousands deep, and even those who got approved for funds have hit snags. Here’s your ERAP update from THE CITY’s Rent Updates newsletter.
Illustrating a growing trend, a private equity firm that scooped up hundreds of rental units in The Bronx is forcing some tenants out, making the case for “Good Cause” eviction protections.