Subway

In the first five months of this year, there have been 449 reported incidents of people riding on top of or outside trains, data shows — which is already almost as many as all of 2019.
Turnstile data analyzed by THE CITY from all 472 stations shows that ridership at three Queens stops along the No. 7 line is currently at more than 65% of 2019 levels, among the highest in the entire subway system.
Just over the city limits in Westchester and Nassau County, riders with disabilities aren’t forced to trek to out-of-the-way “assessment centers” to prove their physical capabilities or lack thereof.
MTA
Citing THE CITY’s report on how subway stations become drug use sites when centers close, the mayor called the situation a crisis that can’t wait. But center operators say they need more funding.
Two uptown subway stations in particular are the default go-to for users when the OnPoint NYC overdose prevention centers close at 8 p.m., locals and officials say.
The deaths of two French artists last month highlight a recent spike in the number of subway graffiti reports as well as the enduring allure of tagging New York trains.
The areas around the West 4th Street, Times Square-42nd Street and 125th Street stations on the Lexington Avenue line had the highest number of “track intrusions,” which are up 20% since before the pandemic.
The entrance on the southeast side of the square has one of the systems’ least reliable escalators and is an assault on the senses.
Frank R. James was caught after a tipster said he was at a Manhattan McDonald’s, officials said. He is being hit with federal terrorism on mass transit charges.
Ten people were directly shot and 19 more were injured in the commotion. Investigators are looking for a Pennsylvania man who they say rented a U-Haul van connected to a key found at the scene.
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From cops declining to enforce his directive to a chronic shortage of shelter and hospital beds, the mayor’s sweeping proposal faces major obstacles.
Last month, when THE CITY reported on the use of life-saving platform barriers in other transit systems, MTA head Janno Lieber said “special complexities in New York” forestalled their implementation here. Now, he’s on board.
While union leaders call for “safety over service,” homeless riders and advocates say the Sept. 2020 ban doesn’t address why people are bringing their belongings into the subway system in the first place.
MTA lines saw 1,006 fires on tracks, in stations and on trains in 2021 — a 40% increase from 2019, even as daily ridership remains a fraction of what it was pre-COVID.
Blaming “multiple failures” when it comes to worker protection, Ty Jeter recounted how she feared for her life when her cab door was kicked in on a southbound No. 6 train.
Many of the nation’s transportation agencies are increasingly turning attention to social services for people dealing with homelessness, mental health issues or addiction. New York City lags down the track from Philadelphia and other cities.
Transit agency officials are looking for futuristic ways to spot people and objects in the path of trains, including lasers, artificial intelligence, machine learning and thermal sensing.
The deadly shoving of Michelle Go in front of an R train on Saturday at the city’s busiest subway station has revived calls for the MTA to install protective shields on train platforms.
Through the end of November — the latest figures provided by the Hate Crime Task Force — 30 of the 84 reported subway bias incidents targeted Asians, a 233% jump from 2020.
The number of subway workers testing positive for COVID-19 has spiked, according to internal MTA data obtained by THE CITY. “It’s putting a tremendous strain on service, because you have so many absences,” said one union official.