Social Services

The demand for food resources continues to grow for many New Yorkers, but closures of community run pantries have resulted in difficulty accessing food banks.
City social service agency imposes limits on orders of fruits and vegetables under federally funded P-FRED initiative. “We didn’t hear anything,” says one volunteer.
A longtime shelter resident, an advocate for homeless people, an academic expert, and the union president representing shelter security officers on what can be done.
With three in four shelter applications rejected, advocates demand permanent adoption of a pandemic pause on children cycling in and out of a Bronx intake center.
Homeless families are getting city decisions to deny shelter overturned in growing numbers — and applying over and over again.
The city has now left all its notorious “cluster” shelter sites. Family homelessness is down. Eric Adams has hinted he likes the Department of Social Services commissioner. Is Banks ready for round two?
After coming in third in the Democratic primary, Wiley says she plans to push for universal community care for children and older adults from outside the mayor’s — and governor’s – office. She’s hoping to get Eric Adams’ ear.
The popular pandemic-inspired program for senior citizens and homebound New Yorkers who can’t afford delivery will shut down when fed funding ends in October, THE CITY has learned.
Workers who get a raise above minimum wage will lose their housing aid under a deal struck this spring between the City Council and de Blasio to cover a higher range of rents. There’s time to fix that income cliff danger before the Sept. 1 upgrade.
Local activists and politicians are working to ensure that donations are sent to the right organizations. Many want to prevent a repeat of when the American Red Cross raised $500 million and only built six homes after the devastating 2010 quake.
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A bill pushed by City Council Speaker Corey Johnson could alter the labor picture at nonprofits. Social service executives say the move could mean more burdens as late city contract payments already bring some to the brink.
Nonprofit groups say a 2017 law requiring translations of key documents into 10 languages isn’t being followed by all city agencies, including the city health department.
For some New Yorkers, the pandemic proved an ironic lifesaver: Spending a year living in clean, private hotel rooms allowed them to get some stability in their lives and finally see hope for the future — if they’re not kicked back into city shelters.
A Coalition for the Homeless study found most people surveyed had been on the streets or subways for at least a year, afraid to go to shelters. Some take refuge in out-of-the-way spots — including behind The Bronx Zoo.
As more religious communities succumb to financial woes worsened by the pandemic, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer offers an “Action Book” for congregants trying to avoid selling out their spiritual homes.
The Fort Washington Avenue Armory, currently a vaccination site, has some of the most coveted public space in Upper Manhattan. But some locals say the nonprofit running the building doesn’t offer equitable access.
A survey commissioned by the de Blasio administration and obtained by THE CITY uncovered a profound need for more food — including a preference for produce they could cook at home.
With off-limits seating and an overnight shutdown, the $1.6 billion transit space that recently opened in Manhattan puts off homeless New Yorkers. “I know it’s not for me,” one man said.
A pandemic-spurred movement has seeded 70 community refrigerators and counting on sidewalks throughout the city — but still not nearly enough to meet neverending demand. Now some established food pantries are aiding the effort.
So-called prone restraints involve adult guards pinning allegedly unruly children on the floor. The move can be deadly.