Real Estate

Mayor reports taxable income on the Bed-Stuy rowhouse he declared his residence, after years of fuzzy and questionable deductions.
Now gaining speed, the plan to toll drivers traveling into Manhattan could threaten the existence of several parking facilities south of 60th Street.
Manhattan lawyer alleges state has been shielding role played by property owner Vornado, which has valuable holdings affected by Gov. Kathy Hochul’s Midtown development plan.
Now that a planned ice skating project is officially over, people who live and work in the neighborhood want to participate in creating the next project from the start.
Councilmember Marjorie Velazquez is against the Bruckner Boulevard upzoning, for now. That could prevent the land use proposal near a Super Foodtown from moving forward.
The developers of the dilapidated empty building near the Cross Bay Bridge long promised a medical facility. The city’s Economic Development Corp. just gave them permission for commercial and office space instead.
Elizabeth Crowley vowed not to take developers’ campaign dollars — but under Citizens United, her union launched a fund mostly paid for by the real estate industry.
As rent-stabilized tenants fear being displaced, the developer has offered only vague promises — and what residents see as ominous plans.
As many as 10 new towers will ring the edge of the much-despised Midtown rail hub to fund possible future transit projects, under Gov. Hochul’s skyline-changing plan.
Four years after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez stunned Joe Crowley, an AOC-pick is running against cousin Elizabeth Crowley in another primary contest pitting a socialist against a moderate.
A key vote paves the way for megadevelopment in Midtown. Gov. Hochul hopes it will lead to money for a Penn revamp but critics have their doubts.
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Echoing the Amazon HQ2 fight, state senators demand a say in Midtown Manhattan redevelopment and hunt for details on vague finances.
Mayor outlines sweeping changes to make housing and other development easier. He’ll need to win over City Council members who just derailed 915 proposed new apartments in Harlem.
Permits are surging during the final days of the 421-a program, which relieves landlords of $1.8 billion a year they say they need to build new housing. Reformers urge a new approach.
Lobbying records indicate Ruben Diaz Jr. is on a six-month $120,000 retainer to lobby the city on behalf of Dynamic Star LLC, the developer behind Fordham Landing. At 40 acres, the anticipated $2 billion development along the Harlem River waterfront dwarfs Hudson Yards.
The nearly 400-foot towers originally had the backing of Rev. Al Sharpton and the promise of a civil rights museum but was vehemently opposed by local elected officials worried about more gentrification in the area.
In 2019, now mayoral Chief of Staff Frank Carone stepped in as fixer for a project with a trail of shaky safety practices, after a 32-year-old woman suffered life-altering brain injuries.
Real estate industry seeks carte blanche to rework older office buildings, as the work-from-home revolution gives edge to neighborhoods with full-time residents.
The 421-a tax incentive costs the state $1.7 billion a year in lost revenue. Builders say, without it, New York’s housing crisis would be even worse. Here’s what to know as Albany debates the discount’s future.
Supertalls proliferated. Cars gave way to busways. Outdoor dining everywhere. Nine neighborhoods have been rezoned. Here’s how the physical city morphed in the last eight years.
Three of New York’s biggest real estate companies are making billion-dollar wagers that pandemic-spurred remote working will give way to a return to buildings. But can they fill millions of square feet of space amid an office glut?