Queens

Construction on the $52 billion project is expected to begin in 2030 — but first it has to get through a public comment period and then be approved by a gauntlet of federal, state and local officials.
The lawsuit against McKinsey & Co. was filed on behalf of the health and welfare funds of dozens of construction trade and other unions.
Longtime boosters of restoring rail service to a 3.5-mile stretch of the LIRR’s abandoned Rockaway Beach Branch said last week’s QueensWay park announcement left them wondering about the prospects for their preferred transit project.
Some companies don’t provide insurance coverage for workers, while others keep it a well-guarded secret — leaving hurt deliveristas in the lurch.
As redistricting continues, the growing South Asian population wants to maximize its political power, but neighboring lawmakers in majority Black districts don’t want that to happen at their expense.
Join THE CITY’s Missing Them project for a conversation in Elmhurst, Queens with free food and PPE from local nonprofit Woodside on the Move.
While the city and state are taking some steps to mitigate future flooding, victims, experts and government officials themselves say more needs to be done.
While officials work toward sewer and drain upgrades and ‘green infrastructure’ to absorb water, people in at-risk neighborhoods know they are vulnerable.
Flooded out of their homes, people who can’t find new housing — even while being helped by city agencies — illustrate the urgency of the affordable housing crisis.
Johnnie Jackson has lived in his family’s St. Albans home for most of his life and owned it for nearly 30 years. First a convicted mortgage scammer took it from him, now a bank is still trying to snatch the property.
Elected officials vow there’s hope on the horizon, but many of the soaked suffering are too exhausted to pursue complicated efforts to get compensation.
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The commission charged with drawing new political boundaries for New York City’s legislative body will take input from the public through the end of August.
The office asserts the system is broken and City Hall can help more, as it follows a century-old legal precedent and rejects payout requests for flood damage.
State law and a complicated bond financing deal stand in the way of bringing legal betting to Citi Field area
A recent beach closure over bacteria highlights that New Yorkers don’t always know what they’re swimming in.
The developers of the dilapidated empty building near the Cross Bay Bridge long promised a medical facility. The city’s Economic Development Corp. just gave them permission for commercial and office space instead.
Elizabeth Crowley vowed not to take developers’ campaign dollars — but under Citizens United, her union launched a fund mostly paid for by the real estate industry.
The less than a decade-old public square in Queens has seen a surge in activity as the pandemic forced immigrant families out of steady jobs and into street sales.
A new partnership between a food delivery giant and the advocacy group New Immigrant Community Empowerment falters after workers question who’s really in charge.
Four years after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez stunned Joe Crowley, an AOC-pick is running against cousin Elizabeth Crowley in another primary contest pitting a socialist against a moderate.
Nomiki Konst says she’s running after being approached by “many people in the community,” but so far she’s raised nearly as much from donors in California as she has from those in New York.