Public Safety

A ruling says state officials went too far in their response to the U.S. Supreme Court decision nixing New York’s tough permit restrictions.
Evolv Technology scanner misses aluminum tubes, even as it sounds alarms for umbrellas, reviews by a tech group and THE CITY found. A deputy mayor’s schedules show repeated meetings with the company.
An audit by the state comptroller documents growing lags in investigating civilian complaints, in part due to delays from the NYPD — and the problem is only getting worse.
911
“We’re not clerical workers: We’re first responders,” said one 10-year veteran dispatcher. “We take one million calls every year. We’re undervalued.”
With the plan to shut down Rikers Island looming, the Department of Correction is prepping for a battle over control of all city lockups.
Lt. Eric Dym faced discipline on 52 allegations, but he won’t be terminated for misconduct. Only one CCRB probe in the past decade has led to that outcome — for the officer who killed Eric Garner.
Officer Vincent D’Andraia agreed to training, coaching and restitution — as urged by a woman injured during the George Floyd demonstrations in 2020.
From backlogged permits to spotty signage, New York’s preparations to keep firearms out of the densely packed Midtown zone remain full of holes.
NYPD Officer Michael Sher was only docked 10 vacation days for failing to file paperwork on the 2020 incident amid anti-police-brutality rallies.
Many seeking religious exemptions have cited fetal tissue research and declining COVID numbers as a reason to keep their jobs, but spiritual leaders and health experts argue otherwise.
Child safety advocates, like a bereaved Rockland County couple, want carmakers to install life-saving technology in every new car.
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The state transit agency is mulling regulation of e-scooters and e-bikes on trains and in stations following several deadly fires in the city caused by exploding lithium-ion batteries.
Charles Guria takes on the official watchdog job with a strong resume but a weak hand, as Department of Investigation records show limited compliance with past directives for change.
Michael Lopez’s mom tells THE CITY he was a good kid with psychiatric needs that were not being met behind bars. And she questions how he was able to get his hands on the drugs he apparently OD’d on.
At least one judge has already rejected the argument, noting that “failing to seek a license before roaming the streets with a loaded firearm is not abiding by the law” and that “The Constitution is not a suicide pact.”
With bathrooms closed since the coronavirus outbreak, the number of train cars that have to be taken out of service because of No. 1 and No 2. is reaching pre-pandemic levels — even as ridership remains lower.
The country’s largest transit agency is finally searching for companies to install doors at Times Square-42nd Street and Third Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan, and Sutphin Boulevard-Archer Avenue in Queens.
“There’s going to be challenges” admits an NYPD lawyer who’s among those puzzling out how to apply hazy new rules passed after the Supreme Court’s gun decision.
A Brooklyn gang first gained control of First Response Cleaning in 2019, and then used the company to extort competitors and muscle the industry with violence and threats, according to a federal indictment.
In the wake of subway violence this spring and accusations of police officers not paying attention underground, Mayor Eric Adams said anyone who sees a cop lollygagging on a mobile device should ping him. Several people did, and were left on read.
In the face of a dire lifeguard shortage, the parks department has gotten approval to truncate the exam required to patrol the city’s smaller watering holes.