Politics

Following a surprising rejection of maps in September, the NYC Redistricting Commission was nearly unanimous in pushing a new set of Council district lines through.
Taxpayer funds given out in the primaries and general last year were nearly 10 times what they were in 2017, the last citywide election, and about three times what they were in 2013.
The Society for the Advancement of Judaism had rented to the Upper West Side Republican Club before the pandemic, but after Jan. 6 they weren’t interested in letting the group return for an event with Dick Morris.
As redistricting continues, the growing South Asian population wants to maximize its political power, but neighboring lawmakers in majority Black districts don’t want that to happen at their expense.
In 2022, members of the family that owns Madison Square Garden and its sports teams gave more than $20,000 in campaign contributions to the Staten Island-based congresswoman who voted against certifying Joe Biden’s election.
If enacted, the proposals would boost spending on environmental projects, define how the city calculates the cost of living and create a new racial equity office.
A handful of leaders voted behind closed doors ahead of the party’s big meeting in September, where newly elected members are expected to push for reforms.
Adams administration officials, including culture commissioner Laurie Cumbo, feature prominently in case that alleges illegal racially discriminatory intent that harms Black voters.
Some progressives are urging Niou to launch a general election bid against Dan Goldman, who spent $4 million of his fortune in the primary, but others caution she doesn’t have the progressive vote locked up.
From same-day registration to nonpartisan primaries to switching election dates, NYC has options to create change. Does it have the will?
With thousands of absentee ballots yet to be counted, around 1,300 votes separated Goldman and Assemblymember Yuh-Line Niou, who refused to concede until every vote is counted.
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Democratic Socialists of America-endorsed González defeats Elizabeth Crowley, despite torrent of real estate industry attack ads.
Just over 3% of eligible voters cast ballots in the five boroughs during the first nine days of voting for new representatives in Congress and the State Senate.
Charter school, real estate and Madison Square Garden poobahs have spent $1.7 million and counting in the last month on a handful of hotly contested state Senate races.
On a fixed income and counting on wages from early voting days, an experienced poll worker suddenly found herself on a Board of Elections do-not-work list.
A crumbling expressway, the threat of rising seas and missing funding for NYCHA: the problems vexing NY-10 and how the area’s next U.S. Representative could help
The commission charged with drawing new political boundaries for New York City’s legislative body will take input from the public through the end of August.
Bypassing primaries, Democratic Party officials ‘backfill’ Civil Court candidates who have no chance of losing.
Asian American groups are divided over how best to build lasting power, as a city redistricting commission gears up to meet this weekend in Brooklyn.
New York City was not a destination when the Texas governor began busing asylum-seekers east. That changed after Adams launched his war of words against Abbott, who’s now sending hundreds to the Big Apple — and scoring a political win.
Elizabeth Crowley vowed not to take developers’ campaign dollars — but under Citizens United, her union launched a fund mostly paid for by the real estate industry.