NYPD

City law enforcement officials and City Council members probed the grimmer side of NYC’s rowdy cannabis gray market.
The police department was previously budgeted for $454 million in overtime pay for the current fiscal year — but is already on pace to spend over $820 million.
Police claimed that Joseph T. assaulted them in the May 2020 incident, but body camera footage published by THE CITY showed otherwise.
Prosecutors cited alleged threats to Comptroller Brad Lander’s staff, in rare city use of state law that allows authorities to remove firearms from people considered potential risks for violence
The allegations had previously been dismissed by the NYPD and the Staten Island District Attorney’s Office despite explosive video footage from two separate car stops in Staten Island in 2018.
The city says that the safe injection site in the neighborhood, the first in the nation, is reducing not just overdoses, but also nearby drug use and crime. But many locals and the NYPD disagree.
Advocates for those with mental health issues requested a temporary stay on the new plan they say broadened the justification for forcibly detaining people. City lawyers say no one has been taken in yet.
The mayor’s new involuntary commitment plan faces big obstacles, starting with a significant drop in the number of cops trained to handle mental health calls and a 911 system that can’t direct those officers to the correct locations.
A broad coalition of groups plan to rally Dec. 15 for a proposed bill that would prevent cops from interrogating minors without counsel or taking them to a precinct without consulting parents first.
Mayor says he’ll instruct NYPD to get people to psychiatric treatment when they fail to meet their “basic needs.” Advocates say he’s crossing a line.
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Mayor says “public safety issues” at his Brooklyn townhouse caused him to rent a room in an apartment leased by Lisa White, who’s now a police deputy commissioner.
Lisa White earns more than $241,000 annually, nearly five times her previous city salary as a 911 operator. From 2013 to 2017, Adams lived in her apartment, and she worked with him for years more.
The announcements became ubiquitous in just a couple of days, but some conductors say it’s background noise and could actually put a bigger target on their backs.
Lt. Eric Dym, who retired in the face of stiff penalties, asks critics: “What do you want to see?” They have some words for him.
Scooters, e-bikes, hoverboards, unicycles — New Yorkers will find all sorts of creative ways to get around. But it’s becoming an e-jungle out there on the streets.
Evolv Technology scanner misses aluminum tubes, even as it sounds alarms for umbrellas, reviews by a tech group and THE CITY found. A deputy mayor’s schedules show repeated meetings with the company.
An audit by the state comptroller documents growing lags in investigating civilian complaints, in part due to delays from the NYPD — and the problem is only getting worse.
911
“We’re not clerical workers: We’re first responders,” said one 10-year veteran dispatcher. “We take one million calls every year. We’re undervalued.”
Jeremy Trapp’s lawyer says he was easily influenced by a police source, but the young man was also convicted for a pandemic loan-fraud scheme that was uncovered during the course of the brake-line-cutting investigation.
It’s a longtime tradition for top leaders in New York’s public sector jobs to stack up vacation days for years and retire with big checks.