Mental Health

After THE CITY and ProPublica exposed a dramatic drop in beds at state psychiatric hospitals, New York’s top law enforcer takes agonized testimony from patients and providers — and the parent who’d told us of her son’s monthslong wait for care.
As part of a federal law signed by Trump in 2020, callers will be able to reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and its local outposts simply by dialing 988. In the city, those calls are plugging into the existing NYC Well.
Supporters of the state’s Extreme Risk Protective Order say it might have put the Buffalo shooter on notice. But court data show that its use is erratic and uneven.
The additional millions are intended to help pay for a wide range of programs, including residential treatment. Gov. Kathy Hochul claims it addresses the bed shortage that has left young people in mental health crisis waiting months for admission.
Plaintiffs allege the state’s Medicaid program has caused young people with serious mental health conditions to suffer unnecessarily, ending up in hospitals and residential treatment programs because they can’t access vital services.
New York cut nearly a third of state-run psychiatric hospital beds for children, pledging to reinvest the funds in outpatient measures. There’s no evidence it worked.
Sen. Brad Hoylman wants New York to pursue a waiver to allow federal funding for long-term residential treatment, which could include innovative alternatives to incarceration.
Last month, when THE CITY reported on the use of life-saving platform barriers in other transit systems, MTA head Janno Lieber said “special complexities in New York” forestalled their implementation here. Now, he’s on board.
Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman was suspended from the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia and asked to resign from the New York State Psychiatric Institute. Some say the reckoning is just beginning.
At a vigil near stabbing victim’s Chinatown building, Asian leaders and groups demand action on mental illness and women’s safety.
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The deadly shoving of Michelle Go in front of an R train on Saturday at the city’s busiest subway station has revived calls for the MTA to install protective shields on train platforms.
The pandemic’s emotional strains are falling especially heavy on communities hit hardest by COVID, unemployment and child care challenges.
Defense lawyers say the Staten Island case highlights the problem of having the NYPD handle emergency calls involving emotionally disturbed people.
The terror attacks showed how schools can offer mental health support after an unprecedented crisis, experts say. But because no two disasters are the same, the city faces new challenges in helping students forever upended by the pandemic.
Self-harm — including suicides — at Rikers Island and other local lockups spiked last summer as COVID-19 ravaged New York, figures obtained by WNYC/Gothamist and THE CITY show. The rate’s climbed to historic levels in the months since.
Some residents training at the Bronx public hospital are in revolt over their allegedly “toxic” workplace following the deaths of three colleagues — two reportedly by suicide. City hospital leaders pledged to boost mental health help.
A pilot program that’s supposed to send teams of EMTs and social workers to help people in emotional distress isn’t working as planned so far: Police are responding to 80% of emergency calls for help, THE CITY has learned.
Jumaane Williams, citing THE CITY’s report that one center is empty and another barely used after millions spent, demands answers on the ThriveNYC projects. “It’s beyond frustrating,” he said.
We took a peek inside a shuttered Bronx facility where NYPD cops are supposed to take emotionally distressed New Yorkers to get help. Another center in East Harlem has served just 45 people — coming out to $1.1 million per visit.
Some 1,200 correction officers called out sick Sunday — more than twice the pre-pandemic average. Union officials and inmate advocates alike fear more lockdowns are on tap for the system’s most vulnerable inmates.