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PHOTOS: Following 2020’s Float-ing Graduation, Seniors Celebrate Together

After documenting the Manhattan Urban Assembly School for Emergency Management’s door-to-door graduation in 2020, THE CITY returned this year to see the high school’s in-person, yet still socially distanced, revelry.

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‘It’s Exciting!’: New Yorkers Cast Ballots With Hopes of a New City for All

Our team fanned out across the five boroughs on a rainy Tuesday to talk to voters weary after an intense and confusing campaign season conducted amid a pandemic. They were united in turning out determined to cast their vote for a better future.

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De Blasio’s Pandemic Heroes Parade Could Use a Clear Invite List ‘Honorees’ Say

With just over two weeks until City Hall’s "Canyon of Heroes" salute to essential workers, many essential workers say they’re still unclear on their place in the parade.

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Primary Color: Scenes From an Unprecedented NYC Mayoral Campaign Season

Check out views from the trail after months of campaigning in a primary made historic by the pandemic and the impending citywide debut of ranked choice voting.

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NYC Park Lovers Say City Nature Trails Need More Green

Partnerships with the Parks Department have left the fate of New York’s hiking trails in the hands of private organizations. Some groups say more needs to be done — and funded — by the city. Meanwhile, a new city plan aims at making trails safer.

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Queens Grabs Bigger Share of Subway Ridership as Pandemic Shifts Commutes

Jackson Heights and Flushing have stations in the system’s top 10 — usually dominated by Manhattan — as traditional rush-hour demand has flattened across the city. It’s a trend some analysts believe could lead the MTA to redistribute subway service.

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PHOTOS: New Yorkers Breathe It All Back in as the City Starts Reopening

From parks in Brooklyn to museums in Manhattan to a certain stadium in The Bronx, our team captured scenes of people re-embracing a city on the rebound.

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Brooklyn Restaurant Renaissance is Cooking, Poised to Overtake Manhattan as City’s Food Capital

Hundreds of new establishments have received permits to open this year, surging into work-from-home neighborhoods while shunning business districts decimated by the pandemic.

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Homeless Reflect on Life in a New York City Hotel Room, One Year Later

For some New Yorkers, the pandemic proved an ironic lifesaver: Spending a year living in clean, private hotel rooms allowed them to get some stability in their lives and finally see hope for the future — if they’re not kicked back into city shelters.

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Bank Shot: Financial Giants’ Return to Manhattan Gives Smaller Businesses Hope

Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan have told their workers to plan to be back in the office — raising prospects that New York’s economic recovery may finally pick up speed.

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A Push to Unlock Subway Bathrooms as the City Gets Moving Again

Restrooms once open to the public at 76 stations have been closed for over a year as part of the MTA’s efforts to stop the spread of COVID-19. With few public toilets above ground either, homeless New Yorkers are hit hardest.

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COVID and Cabin Fever Inspire New Uses of NYC Outdoor Space This Summer

Brand new park space, a return to summertime classics and — of course — skirmishes about how to use streets and sidewalks will mark the 2021 hot weather season. Here’s what to look out for while you’re out and about.

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NYC Looks to Bring Staten Island Yankees’ Old Baseball Stadium Back to Life Next Season

The 20-year-old Richmond County Bank Ballpark could soon be home to a team from the Atlantic League, the last stop for some ex-major leaguers. Meanwhile, the empty diamond is costing taxpayers over $500,000 to maintain.

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Washington Heights Armory on Defense Over Who Gets to Use Space

The Fort Washington Avenue Armory, currently a vaccination site, has some of the most coveted public space in Upper Manhattan. But some locals say the nonprofit running the building doesn’t offer equitable access.

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Your Pandemic Anniversary: What ‘a Year Later’ Means for These New Yorkers

The reality of the coronavirus crisis sank in at very different moments for many across the city. Here are six New Yorkers’ recollections of when the pandemic began for them.

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From Wards Island to Amazon Warehouse in Jersey, This Commute Is Hell on Wheels

Saheed Adebayo Aare has had to navigate a lot since arriving from Nigeria and gaining asylum. His 31-mile one-way commute by bus, train and wheelchair is no exception: He travels six hours round-trip for a four-hour shift.

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PHOTOS: NYC Nor’easter Brings Snow Globe Scenes

For the first time in nearly a year, much of the city was eerily quiet for reasons other than solely the pandemic.

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Dog Rescues Curbed by Surging Global Travel Costs Driven by Pandemic

NYC groups that organize animal adoptions from around the world say COVID-19 travel restrictions have made international transportation costly where not impossible.

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Best Hope for NYC’s Economy in 2021: A ‘Transition Year’ With Modest Gains by the Fall

Even with vaccinations unfolding, the impending Biden presidency and Democratic control of the Senate, the city’s comeback will be slow, forecasters say.

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Subway Train Operator Haunted by Two Deaths on the Job in One Week. MTA and Union Officials Say the Tragedies Point to a Larger Crisis

Jerome Golden had piloted trains for 17 years without being involved in a deadly accident. Between Dec. 19 and Dec. 26, two women were killed by trains he was driving. Subway deaths rose slightly last year, despite the pandemic ridership plunge.