Life

Experts say New Yorkers should come with specific, explicit questions and plans on what to do next.
More public school swim lessons, flexible hours, and adopting “shallow water” rules are all possible streams to more robust beach and pool seasons in the years to come.
Before the start of the pandemic, 1 in 5 children in the city were hungry. Now it’s 1 in 4, according to anti-hunger nonprofit City Harvest. Advocates are concerned the problem will get worse.
For many New Yorkers, shirts with “SOHK” and “Queens 7” designs captured the pride and toughness of the World’s Borough. The brand began in the Corona shop of Ortner “Von” Murray, whose life, cut short by COVID, will be honored on Saturday.
Dozens of applicants who’d previously failed the qualifying tests were sent automated text messages this week from the Parks Department gauging their interest in taking a new accelerated class to become lifeguards.
The Parks Department is facing a dire shortage of lifeguards for the city’s dozens of pools and beaches with just 480 certified guards.
The new budget also significantly increases New York City’s “rainy day fund,” but will not be official (or detailed) until the Council’s vote next week.
Electric bills were already going up in the winter, but the summer is traditionally the season when prices soar even higher. Some New Yorkers have to make the choice between staying cool and staying fed.
With the Adams admin pushing homeless sweeps and canceling at least three shelters the pro-homeless volunteers are ramping up efforts to help other New Yorkers welcome struggling people rather than shoo them away.
A Brooklyn mother’s search for a Lakota instructor leads her to the Language Conservancy, an organization teaching Native languages even after being condemned by the Sioux Nation’s leading council earlier this month.
Five months after the city Department of Investigation suggested 13 ways to clean up the Parks Department’s Lifeguard Division, none of them have been fully acted upon as beach season is upon us.
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Those who flock to the sands of Bay 1 on Riis beach — including a historically Black and brown community of trans and queer sunbathers — fear tearing down a long-abandoned medical center that acted as a shield will ruin their “utopia.”
The deaths of two French artists last month highlight a recent spike in the number of subway graffiti reports as well as the enduring allure of tagging New York trains.
Three-story 5G-transmitting towers are coming soon to a corner near you — doubling down on bringing free Wi-Fi hotspots to areas outside Manhattan.
New York is one of the few states that categorize pets as objects not worth more than a few hundred dollars. Advocates say treating them as sentient beings would enhance the ability to seek compensatory damages if they are mistreated.
Under a legislative proposal due for introduction next week, all New Yorkers would be required to separate their food scraps and set it on their curbs for pickup. The city’s Independent Budget Office estimates a citywide composting program could save $33 million annually — after five years.
As pets are still being jolted, city oversight of Con Edison equipment and inspects called into question. The DOT says there’s no problem, but data says otherwise.
Former Mayor Bill de Blasio terminated a Trump company’s contract to run Ferry Point Park golf course last year citing the ex-president’s role in stirring up the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.
The Biden administration has yet to release any plans, leaving the city’s agencies and nonprofits in the dark.
The New York Mets’ billionaire owner has been pushing City Hall for development around his Queens ballpark, possibly including gambling and nature trails.
A 15-year-old agreement to put 20 automatic sidewalk toilets around the city has been completely stalled for the last two years, with 15 restrooms still not in service.