Justice

Jeremy Trapp’s lawyer says he was easily influenced by a police source, but the young man was also convicted for a pandemic loan-fraud scheme that was uncovered during the course of the brake-line-cutting investigation.
“They don’t need a license. Anyone can do it. They’re not regulated unless the attorney general has the time to crack down on them. And they can’t go after everybody because it’s like whack-a-mole, right?”
The ruling, which isn’t binding on other judges but will surely be noted by them, was based on the 2019 bail reform law’s requirement judges consider “ability to post bail without posing undue hardship.”
With the plan to shut down Rikers Island looming, the Department of Correction is prepping for a battle over control of all city lockups.
New York State will award its first 150 marijuana retail licenses to people penalized in the past for dealing — but a daunting application stands in the way of going legal.
A new report from the Board of Correction states that “a pervasive issue of insufficient supervision by correctional staff” was a factor in most tragedies behind bars.
If enacted, the proposals would boost spending on environmental projects, define how the city calculates the cost of living and create a new racial equity office.
Facing three law-enforcement probes and safety complaints by neighbors, the controversial firm that puts former detainees in unused hotels is shutting down the program.
Rikers Island was designed to hold people accused of crimes less than a year. Why have some detainees been there for six, eight and even 10 years?
The Senate’s $433 billion Inflation Reduction Act marks the most significant federal action on climate change yet. What does it mean locally?
Not only was John Teixeria granted a rare “medical parole” in January 2020 but he’s also received standard parole every six months since then. But state prison officials say they have no place to send him in his condition.
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Michael Lopez’s mom tells THE CITY he was a good kid with psychiatric needs that were not being met behind bars. And she questions how he was able to get his hands on the drugs he apparently OD’d on.
When people with mental health issues enter the criminal justice system and the city’s lock-ups, they often get less help and more trauma.
In its first report since the pandemic began, the Commission to Combat Police Corruption says several cops who should have been fired for terrible behavior and lies were allowed to keep their jobs.
A new ‘Risk Management and Accountability System’ was all set to go, but following criticism from a federal monitor and reporting by THE CITY, the changes are on hold.
New York’s plan to shut down Rikers includes a mandate to flip all unused jail buildings back to the Department of Citywide Administrative Services. But the Department of Correction isn’t giving up a facility it just closed, despite a looming deadline.
A vicious attack left Meghan Van Alystyne with extensive injuries and brain trauma. She gave up on navigating the Office of Victim Services’ bureaucracy — and she’s not alone.
A fifth person this year died behind bars at Rikers Island on Wednesday morning — the first woman in three years — just hours after officials announced they were overhauling their last overhaul.
The plea on behalf of Nachemya Weberman, who has only served nine years of a 50-year sentence, appears to be the only time District Attorney Eric Gonzalez intervened for someone convicted of a sex crime.
Three years ago, the Department of Investigation recommended that the Department of Correction update its system of tracking violent incidents from old-school secret logbooks to a transparent digital system. Nothing has changed yet.
Under New York’s sweeping climate law, certain neighborhoods are guaranteed to get attention and money if they qualify as disadvantaged. Find out how to check your block’s designation — and weigh in on the process.