Justice

A fifth person this year died behind bars at Rikers Island on Wednesday morning — the first woman in three years — just hours after officials announced they were overhauling their last overhaul.
The plea on behalf of Nachemya Weberman, who has only served nine years of a 50-year sentence, appears to be the only time District Attorney Eric Gonzalez intervened for someone convicted of a sex crime.
Three years ago, the Department of Investigation recommended that the Department of Correction update its system of tracking violent incidents from old-school secret logbooks to a transparent digital system. Nothing has changed yet.
Under New York’s sweeping climate law, certain neighborhoods are guaranteed to get attention and money if they qualify as disadvantaged. Find out how to check your block’s designation — and weigh in on the process.
New York is one of the few states that categorize pets as objects not worth more than a few hundred dollars. Advocates say treating them as sentient beings would enhance the ability to seek compensatory damages if they are mistreated.
Citing an “extraordinary level of violence and disorder” in city jails, Manhattan U.S. Attorney Damian Williams wrote an angry letter to a federal judge on Tuesday saying his next step would be “more aggressive relief.”
After THE CITY reported on Exodus Transitional Community’s troubled contract, Mayor Eric Adams is under pressure to spike the arrangement.
An investigation by THE CITY revealed that an unlicensed security firm was working at hotels housing inmates released from Rikers. City Hall still hasn’t gotten it right.
Global Operations Security claimed it was licensed to provide security at an inmate-release hotel run by Exodus Transitional Community. Our investigation found it wasn’t.
The city’s payout is the latest in a long list of seven-figure settlements made after jail-related deaths.
After an investigation by THE CITY, the Department of State is referring an unlicensed security firm to the Queens DA and the State AG for possible criminal prosecution.
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The street-crime police units are back under Mayor Adams with a new name. Officials say they will be looking for guns in 30 precincts. Can you record them on your phone? Do they have to provide ID? We answer these questions and more.
The City Council has still not introduced any measure to end solitary confinement in city jails despite a majority of members publicly opposing the practice. The public advocate’s office meanwhile has taken up the mantle and says a bill will be introduced in weeks.
City Hall hired consulting giant KPMG in 2018 to help manage the transfer of teens from adult jails to juvenile detention. How’s that going?
Tracy McCarter won a small concession from prosecutors, but the case drags on despite the new progressive district attorney’s labeling her charges “unjust” while looking to woo voters.
Memo to judges fast tracks firearms possession, spurring concerns that defendants could be pushed into plea deals.
New York’s major parole policy reform went into effect March 1. It aims to transform how formerly incarcerated people are treated. Here’s how it works.
Local leaders vow tough consequences for violence against Asians, Jews and other discriminated-against groups. But just 15% result in a hate crime conviction — and just 1% in The Bronx.
A Bronx couple who say they are among dozens if not hundreds of New Yorkers unfairly billed by the Brooklyn-based physicians
Windows spontaneously shatter and regular flooding keeps a floor of trial rooms off limits at the courthouse, designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects