Immigrants

Nuevos datos del Departamento de Salud de la ciudad apuntan a la disparidad de raza y género que podría surgir de enfermedades preexistentes y del acceso a la atención médica.
Staff jump in to provide education and many other essentials for an unexpected influx of some six dozen migrant youth.
A former party leader in the borough says ‘ghost appointees’ are not a new phenomenon.
A web of relief workers is still scrambling to help give newly arrived migrants what they need, including warm clothes, MetroCards and toiletries. Here’s how to lend a hand or donate.
Pervaiz Shallwani dipped a hot dog into New York’s melting pot, and what came out was delicious.
Neither side is saying what’s behind the dispute, but Make The Road NY has asked a court to toss the debt claim. Meanwhile, the Department of Buildings says the contractor didn’t properly insure workers.
While migrants often say their long journey to the United States has been worthwhile, adapting to the city is still an uphill battle.
Mayor Oscar Leeser, a Democrat, offers asylum-seekers who just crossed the Rio Grande a free bus ride out of town — as long as it’s to New York or Chicago. Police recently evicted an encampment of people who refused.
The decades-old shelter policy would have to go back to court to be undone, experts say.
Promises from Mayor Eric Adams to connect kids with translators and backpacks only begins to address the trauma of treks over thousands of miles to America.
New York City can be a daunting place, especially if you have nowhere to live. Documented put together a guide for exercising your right to shelter, which applies even if you didn’t just get here.
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At one Bronx library, dozens daily are applying for city-issued identification cards in order to work locally after crossing the U.S. border 2,000 miles away.
“The need is overwhelming” but there are a limited number of funds going directly to refugees in search of housing, food and employment.
The city’s elected officials in Albany want to establish a regulatory framework that would prevent detained immigrants from having to pay exorbitant fees, including upwards of $400 a month for the privilege of wearing an ankle monitor.
The demand for food resources continues to grow for many New Yorkers, but closures of community run pantries have resulted in difficulty accessing food banks.
The Biden administration has yet to release any plans, leaving the city’s agencies and nonprofits in the dark.
Gov. Kathy Hochul seeks to spend an additional $10 billion to help pull New York out of its COVID crisis — sums topped by the legislative leaders she’s negotiating a final deal with. Business leaders warn New York can’t afford extensive new commitments.
A $2.1 billion program aimed at helping undocumented workers excluded from unemployment benefits was exhausted in two months. It’s still unclear whether Albany lawmakers will push to extend it.
Erick Salgado, a Brooklyn pastor who has spoken publicly against same-sex marriage, is going to be in charge of outreach for the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.
The future of any leftover money is unclear but advocates and some lawmakers are pushing for the creation of a permanent relief fund for undocumented folks affected by disasters.
In the absence of comprehensive governmental safety nets, New York women banded together, adapted their skill sets, organized aid and fought for policy changes. What’s next for them?