Immigrants

The city’s elected officials in Albany want to establish a regulatory framework that would prevent detained immigrants from having to pay exorbitant fees, including upwards of $400 a month for the privilege of wearing an ankle monitor.
The demand for food resources continues to grow for many New Yorkers, but closures of community run pantries have resulted in difficulty accessing food banks.
The Biden administration has yet to release any plans, leaving the city’s agencies and nonprofits in the dark.
Gov. Kathy Hochul seeks to spend an additional $10 billion to help pull New York out of its COVID crisis — sums topped by the legislative leaders she’s negotiating a final deal with. Business leaders warn New York can’t afford extensive new commitments.
A $2.1 billion program aimed at helping undocumented workers excluded from unemployment benefits was exhausted in two months. It’s still unclear whether Albany lawmakers will push to extend it.
Erick Salgado, a Brooklyn pastor who has spoken publicly against same-sex marriage, is going to be in charge of outreach for the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.
The future of any leftover money is unclear but advocates and some lawmakers are pushing for the creation of a permanent relief fund for undocumented folks affected by disasters.
In the absence of comprehensive governmental safety nets, New York women banded together, adapted their skill sets, organized aid and fought for policy changes. What’s next for them?
Hochul comes to Queens Monday to announce $27 million in cash assistance for flooding victims excluded from FEMA help — including many still rebuilding their homes just blocks from where the governor will speak.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency has so far doled out $10 million to New Yorkers impacted by the devastating remnants of Hurricane Ida earlier this month. But many undocumented immigrants are being left out of that pool.
The city’s 65,000 app-based food delivery couriers earn an average of $7.87 an hour before tips — propping up a multi-billion dollar tech industry that relies on young immigrant workers who deal with robberies, crashes and worse on city streets.
GOT A TIP?
We’re here to listen. Email tips@thecity.nyc or visit our tips page for other ways to share.
In her first day in office, the state’s 57th governor moves to rebuild trust damaged by secrecy and sexual harassment under Andrew Cuomo. On her agenda: cleaning up Albany, speeding up rent and worker aid — and vaccine mandates.
The fall of Kabul has Afghans in New York mobilizing to help their families back home — along with any compatriots who may soon find themselves in the city. Some of the first refugees arrived at Kennedy Airport this week.
Local activists and politicians are working to ensure that donations are sent to the right organizations. Many want to prevent a repeat of when the American Red Cross raised $500 million and only built six homes after the devastating 2010 quake.
A national alliance of Temporary Protected Status holders sees New York and its politicians as a pressure-point in the fight for citizenship for immigrants temporarily allowed to live and work here due to turmoil in their home countries.
As an industry-supported proposal to allow gig workers some union rights dies in Albany, efforts to regulate food app delivery companies ratchet up in the City Council.
Nonprofit groups say a 2017 law requiring translations of key documents into 10 languages isn’t being followed by all city agencies, including the city health department.
City Council candidates in Coney Island, Brighton Beach and Sheepshead Bay strive to fill the void left by shut-down community centers relied on by older people and those who don’t speak English.
While much of New York City springs into hopeful reopening buoyed by widespread vaccination, survivors at the pandemic’s epicenter contend with ongoing economic and emotional traumas. Just ask the vendors in Corona Plaza.
Local 32BJ SEIU, building on success raising wages in the fast food industry, strategizes with Los Deliveristas Unidos to win better conditions and pay for thousands of rolling gig workers barred from unionizing.