Housing

Permits are surging during the final days of the 421-a program, which relieves landlords of $1.8 billion a year they say they need to build new housing. Reformers urge a new approach.
Highlights from the 2021 Housing and Vacancy Survey, a key study of the city’s housing stock and its affordability.
Housing officials claim that no residents were “adversely impacted,” but one 90-year-old Holocaust survivor told THE CITY he was “in a state of panic.”
The public housing authority admits it erroneously informed Section 8-subsidized renters their aid was ending, after a tech meltdown made paperwork disappear. A solution is still far off.
The Rent Guidelines Board will hold two public hearings in June before a final vote on rent regulated lease renewals. Here’s how to testify.
A compromise touted by Mayor Eric Adams leaves nobody happy, with landlords warning about higher costs and tenant advocates pointing to a spike in evictions and homelessness.
The nearly 400-foot towers originally had the backing of Rev. Al Sharpton and the promise of a civil rights museum but was vehemently opposed by local elected officials worried about more gentrification in the area.
The state legislature has passed a measure intended to counter a court ruling that made it easier for lenders to win cases against homeowners. Sponsors say industry warnings about unintended consequences are overblown.
Following a damning Justice Department complaint documenting years of lead paint and other coverups, improvements remain far off track, a report NYCHA refused to release shows.
The new figures are a guide for the nine-member Rent Guidelines Board before they make a preliminary recommendation in May, then a final vote on rent guidelines in June.
The Rent Guidelines Board kept rent increases historically low during the de Blasio administration. The board must vote on rent prices by July 1, and Mayor Eric Adams’ recent appointees are worrying tenant advocates.
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“Oh my God! No!” shouts one of his co-workers in an exclusive video obtained by THE CITY.
The union contract for 30,000 residential building workers who catered to wealthy New Yorkers through the pandemic is expiring — and owners from Billionaire’s Row to The Dakota are demanding that workers help pay for their health insurance.
A coalition of consumer and community groups calls on Mayor Eric Adams and Comptroller Brad Lander to pull the plug on the fourth largest US-based bank.
The city housing agency is looking to rezone sections of The Rockaways for its Resilient Edgemere Community Plan. But locals decry the prospect of bigger buildings, and renters.
New numbers from the Center for New York City Neighborhoods show more than 8% of homeowners in majority-Black communities were behind on payments last September.
Gov. Kathy Hochul seeks to spend an additional $10 billion to help pull New York out of its COVID crisis — sums topped by the legislative leaders she’s negotiating a final deal with. Business leaders warn New York can’t afford extensive new commitments.
Budget watchdog warns letting the 421-a program lapse will doom needed new housing development, while city comptroller urges cancellation along with a property tax overhaul.
More than 10% of people matched with a publicly funded attorney for housing cases made above the income limit once set for who could get a free lawyer. Advocates say it points to a need for free legal help beyond just the city’s poorest.
Real estate industry seeks carte blanche to rework older office buildings, as the work-from-home revolution gives edge to neighborhoods with full-time residents.
The backlog is thousands deep, and even those who got approved for funds have hit snags. Here’s your ERAP update from THE CITY’s Rent Updates newsletter.