Housing

While migrants often say their long journey to the United States has been worthwhile, adapting to the city is still an uphill battle.
Every new unit must be built in someone’s backyard, but the current approval process stymies building, say developers and some advocates.
At a tense City Council Hearing, NYCHA officials were grilled about the authority’s lethargic response to complaints about cloudy water and positive arsenic test results. Its chairman was a no-show.
On eve of a Council investigative hearing, sources say weeks went by without action, even as tenants filed dozens of complaints of foul, cloudy water.
Gregory Russ will step down as CEO, Mayor Eric Adams announced, while remaining the public housing authority chair at a $258,000 salary. Now-retracted tests that showed arsenic in drinking water is just the latest scandal Russ faced.
City Council committees are seeking a clear explanation from public housing officials and Mayor Eric Adams about what exactly happened with the water at Jacob Riis Houses.
Federal monitor Bart Schwartz told public housing tenants he’s working with the city Department of Investigation, which has subpoena power, to review how arsenic came to be detected (and then not) in residents’ drinking water.
NYCHA and the city still haven’t explained when they first became concerned about potential contamination, or why it took three days for the results to be made public.
Mayor Eric Adams maintains that results showing arsenic in the drinking water at Manhattan’s Riis houses were “questionable” — while not revealing that new clean results come from taps that had been flowing for an extended time first.
Eric Adams is promising transparency as his administration probes how things got so cloudy in the first place.
The federal overseer of the city’s public housing system demands all documentation be preserved, as it pursues investigation into toxic water at Manhattan’s Riis Houses.
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Johnnie Jackson has lived in his family’s St. Albans home for most of his life and owned it for nearly 30 years. First a convicted mortgage scammer took it from him, now a bank is still trying to snatch the property.
Elected officials vow there’s hope on the horizon, but many of the soaked suffering are too exhausted to pursue complicated efforts to get compensation.
A crumbling expressway, the threat of rising seas and missing funding for NYCHA: the problems vexing NY-10 and how the area’s next U.S. Representative could help
Renovation of an Upper West Side apartment building is the cause of disputes between longtime residents and new ownership.
Before the widely used construction incentive expired this spring, one-third as many building permits were issued than when the last expiration loomed.
The office asserts the system is broken and City Hall can help more, as it follows a century-old legal precedent and rejects payout requests for flood damage.
For years, NYCHA management ignored a 2018 DOI recommendation to ban lithium-ion battery powered devices in public housing. Three people, including a 5-year-old girl today, have been killed in related fires since.
Immigrant families who’ve tried in vain to find their own apartments are at the breaking point — and showing up seeking homeless services after doubling up with family and friends.
As part of Gov. Hochul’s sweeping Penn Station area redevelopment plan, the former Bayview Correctional Facility would turn into 60 affordable residences with social services on site.
On the campaign trail last summer, Eric Adams decried the condition of public housing playgrounds highlighted by THE CITY. As mayor, however, the number of closed playgrounds has actually gone up.