Homeless Shelters

At one Bronx library, dozens daily are applying for city-issued identification cards in order to work locally after crossing the U.S. border 2,000 miles away.
Immigrant families who’ve tried in vain to find their own apartments are at the breaking point — and showing up seeking homeless services after doubling up with family and friends.
Mayor Eric Adams says every community must do its part to house the homeless. Yet his own Department of Homeless Services is canceling planned shelters in the face of community pushback.
Fred Kreizman worked for mega-lobbyist Capalino and Associates on behalf of condo, warehouse and shelter developers until Eric Adams was inaugurated. Now he’s in charge of the mayor’s office that interacts with community boards and local concerns.
Mayor Eric Adams has pledged to open 1,400 shelter beds by mid-2023, a promise that’s farther away with the downtown closures.
After THE CITY reported on Exodus Transitional Community’s troubled contract, Mayor Eric Adams is under pressure to spike the arrangement.
The shelter on White Plains Road was to be run by Westhab, in a building owned by David Levitan, once identified by the city as one of its “worst landlords.”
A longtime shelter resident, an advocate for homeless people, an academic expert, and the union president representing shelter security officers on what can be done.
Homeless families are getting city decisions to deny shelter overturned in growing numbers — and applying over and over again.
Many of the nation’s transportation agencies are increasingly turning attention to social services for people dealing with homelessness, mental health issues or addiction. New York City lags down the track from Philadelphia and other cities.
More than 200,000 eviction cases currently pending in city housing courts could begin to move forward again as early as Tuesday. Read this if yours may be one of them.
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Young people sleeping in New York’s youth homeless shelters and those leaving foster care will soon have direct access to housing vouchers, thanks to a pair of bills the City Council passed Tuesday.
The city has now left all its notorious “cluster” shelter sites. Family homelessness is down. Eric Adams has hinted he likes the Department of Social Services commissioner. Is Banks ready for round two?
Some 80 men will live in the former Park Savoy Hotel on West 58th Street. Homeless Services Commissioner Steve Banks said the battle to stop its opening was “the longest and most well-funded litigation” over a city shelter.
When Mayor de Blasio began transferring New Yorkers experiencing homelessness from hotels back to shelters in June, some turned to the streets. Others say they live in fear of catching COVID in close quarters. Here are some of their stories.
De Blasio names a firm tied to CORE Services Group and Bobby Jones Links to run deluxe Ferry Point golf grounds. Trump lawyers say the mayor’s “political retaliation” is a losing game and that the ex-president is in for the long haul.
New Yorkers in youth homeless shelters would finally get credit for time spent there instead of having to enter the chaotic and dangerous adult system to receive housing vouchers.
Young people won’t have to automatically go to an adult shelter to become eligible for permanent housing help, thanks to new city and federal new direct rental assistance. But the first-come, first-served efforts are limited.
For some New Yorkers, emergency housing during the pandemic offered a life line: the privacy and peace of a safe and comfortable hotel room. That will now end by late July. Moving day for men at the Upper West Side’s Lucerne Hotel came Monday.
Officials agreed to route young people to live in adult shelters in order to obtain vouchers for permanent housing — even after the mayor promised direct access to help, document obtained by THE CITY shows.
A Coalition for the Homeless study found most people surveyed had been on the streets or subways for at least a year, afraid to go to shelters. Some take refuge in out-of-the-way spots — including behind The Bronx Zoo.