Health

In the second year of the Adams administration, public employees are asking when raises might be coming — but a bitter and costly fight over retiree health care isn’t over.
In a growing number of lawsuits, municipal workers who were put on unpaid leave or terminated after seeking religious exemptions to an employee COVID shot mandate are getting judges to order their reinstatement.
More than 9,000 Health + Hospitals employees seek commitments to fewer patients at a time. But as public employees, it’s illegal for them to go on strike.
There are care clinics for long COVID, local support groups, and ideas from those living with this illness. Here’s what you should know if you’re trying to navigate chronic symptoms in New York City.
Josefa Bonet of Manhattan’s Riis Houses had four times the normal level of arsenic in her system when she died.
Closed investigation files reveal various misconduct at the Health and Hospitals Corporation, including a head surgeon who made staff plan his wedding and an ex-CEO who bent rules to secure his next job.
At an MTA hearing on Wednesday, board members also approved a budget that anticipates service cuts and fare hikes.
Public defender groups want the Department of Correction to pay $250 for each detainee denied scheduled treatment at clinics and hospitals.
Chilly residents of one Baruch building are also dealing with holes in the wall and leaks in the ceiling that get plastered over, but not fixed.
At least three big-box pharmacy locations have shuttered since February, forcing residents to travel longer distances to wait in longer lines.
The ruling puts pressure on the city to finalize a Medicare Advantage plan for a quarter million retirees — and may lead to the elimination of Senior Care.
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The city says that the safe injection site in the neighborhood, the first in the nation, is reducing not just overdoses, but also nearby drug use and crime. But many locals and the NYPD disagree.
The mayor’s new involuntary commitment plan faces big obstacles, starting with a significant drop in the number of cops trained to handle mental health calls and a 911 system that can’t direct those officers to the correct locations.
Journalists are often expected to identify their sources, but reporting on children presents a number of dilemmas, particularly when issues of mental health are involved.
With union bargaining heating up from Montefiore to Mount Sinai, clinicians say their pleas for more personnel are going dangerously unaddressed.
Nuevos datos del Departamento de Salud de la ciudad apuntan a la disparidad de raza y género que podría surgir de enfermedades preexistentes y del acceso a la atención médica.
A court-ordered timeline for fixing boilers and elevators and eliminating toxins and pests is imperiled by a gigantic deficit in rental revenue, says the housing authority.
Mayor says he’ll instruct NYPD to get people to psychiatric treatment when they fail to meet their “basic needs.” Advocates say he’s crossing a line.
Doctors and medical staff at Interfaith, Kingsbrook and Brookdale hospitals have been unable to access patients’ electronic medical records since last Saturday.
Most kids labeled as having an “emotional disability” and shunted into public special education schools are Black or Latino, and low income — while wealthier families more often access a taxpayer-funded free private education.
For 20 years, Clarissa Crader has done everything in her power to get Justin Campbell care for his schizophrenia. He just got off probation after beating an elderly man. Now what?