Gun Violence

From sweeping definitions on what counts as a ‘sensitive location’ to new licensing requirements, Albany plans to test the Supreme Court’s recent decision. Some Second Amendment experts are skeptical.
In the wake of the Supreme Court decision striking down New York’s concealed carry law, the City Council is exploring one option: a law that would declare any area with more than 10,000 people per square mile a “sensitive location.”
“We’re not sleeping on this ruling,” the mayor told THE CITY, explaining how NYC could restrict firearms in certain sensitive places.
“You’re talking about DOI? I’m talking about DOA,” says mayor of Department of Investigation probe that found financial impropriety and nepotism at Andre Mitchell’s Man Up! organization.
A similar law was recently struck down in California — and even if Gov. Kathy Hochul’s proposal passes and survives court challenges, other gun loopholes abound.
Supporters of the state’s Extreme Risk Protective Order say it might have put the Buffalo shooter on notice. But court data show that its use is erratic and uneven.
The Advance Peace model of mentoring and rewards for reaching life goals has been proven to work in other cities and is about to get its biggest test yet.
Brooklyn Sen. Zellnor Myrie targets 2005 law that forbids suits against companies on behalf of victims of their firearms, saying New York would be the first state to strike back. The bill comes as shootings are spiking in the city.
Borough president hopefuls speak out after our team report reveals gunshot victims are more likely to die the farther they are from a trauma hospital.
Data indicates distance to a trauma center plays a life-or-death role. There’s only one trauma center in southern Queens, and it’s struggling.
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