Food

Pervaiz Shallwani dipped a hot dog into New York’s melting pot, and what came out was delicious.
The inspection report, obtained by THE CITY, also found other violations including old food residue on surfaces like a matcha stirrer and a cappuccino nozzle.
Campylobacter is a gastrointestinal bug that can come from eating raw or undercooked poultry. About 50 cases have been reported so far to city health authorities.
Scooters, e-bikes, hoverboards, unicycles — New Yorkers will find all sorts of creative ways to get around. But it’s becoming an e-jungle out there on the streets.
E-bike and phone chargers are coming soon to City Hall Park and other spots, after drivers for companies like Grubhub and DoorDash dreamed of having warm places to pause between runs.
Operator Howard Hughes Corporation says new upscale dining hall from the French food impresario fulfills its obligation under a 2013 deal with the City Council for locavore food stalls — while a longstanding nonprofit market gets shunted to a small storefront.
A Black-led grassroots project is trying to acquire space for a member-operated grocery store that could sell fresh food at affordable rates for residents.
New bills would require licenses and limits for Gorillas, Getir and other “dark store” delivery operations. A supermarket union helped shape the measures.
On July 31, the Sanitation Department will begin issuing fines between $250 and $1,000 for establishments that don’t separate and process their organic waste, officials say.
Food insecurity has jumped by 36% in the city. And it’s higher among children. An estimated 1 in 4 kids don’t have enough to eat — a 46% increase over pre-pandemic numbers.
Complaint filed with National Labor Relations Board alleges termination of Brenda Garcia interfered in SEIU fast food labor drive, while city case alleging scheduling law violations continues. Chipotle claims Garcia was never terminated.
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The demand for food resources continues to grow for many New Yorkers, but closures of community run pantries have resulted in difficulty accessing food banks.
City social service agency imposes limits on orders of fruits and vegetables under federally funded P-FRED initiative. “We didn’t hear anything,” says one volunteer.
Twin Parks tenants now living in hotels had been getting hot meals delivered by the distinguished World Central Kitchen. But when that organization pivoted to Ukraine, a group run by a mayoral pal stepped in.
The Deliveristas who kept New Yorkers fed during the pandemic will get bathroom access, minimum delivery payments and the tips they earned, under bills approved Thursday by the City Council. Supporters hope the first-of-their-kind regulations will become a national model.
The city’s 65,000 app-based food delivery couriers earn an average of $7.87 an hour before tips — propping up a multi-billion dollar tech industry that relies on young immigrant workers who deal with robberies, crashes and worse on city streets.
Eating at an indoor restaurant is limited to those who have been fully vaccinated. But in classrooms, many students remain too young for vaccines. Experts warn that lunchtime could be the riskiest part of the school day.
Even as the city shut down amid record rainfall, e-bike couriers kept picking up food for paltry pay — including $5 for an hour-long journey from Astoria to Brooklyn. Los Deliveristas Unidos members renewed their demands for better treatment.
The popular pandemic-inspired program for senior citizens and homebound New Yorkers who can’t afford delivery will shut down when fed funding ends in October, THE CITY has learned.
The eatery, powered by “nonnas” — or grandmothers — from around the world, has gone organic and added a Japanese element ahead of its grand reopening Friday. The eatery had shut early in the pandemic, due to the ages of its beloved rotating chefs.
Families will receive up to $132 for the months their child was out of school buildings for more than 12 days, under federal COVID relief program. Since New York City is a universal school lunch district, all will get benefits, regardless of income.