Families

From grief camps to mentoring to financial aid, free resources are available to help young people weather devastating loss.
Before the start of the pandemic, 1 in 5 children in the city were hungry. Now it’s 1 in 4, according to anti-hunger nonprofit City Harvest. Advocates are concerned the problem will get worse.
On the campaign trail last summer, Eric Adams decried the condition of public housing playgrounds highlighted by THE CITY. As mayor, however, the number of closed playgrounds has actually gone up.
Food insecurity has jumped by 36% in the city. And it’s higher among children. An estimated 1 in 4 kids don’t have enough to eat — a 46% increase over pre-pandemic numbers.
In the face of a dire lifeguard shortage, the parks department has gotten approval to truncate the exam required to patrol the city’s smaller watering holes.
“The need is overwhelming” but there are a limited number of funds going directly to refugees in search of housing, food and employment.
Dozens of applicants who’d previously failed the qualifying tests were sent automated text messages this week from the Parks Department gauging their interest in taking a new accelerated class to become lifeguards.
Citing THE CITY’s MISSING THEM reporting on the pandemic’s effect on children who’ve lost parents or other guardians, Council members want the child welfare agency to deliver quarterly reports on minors placed in foster care due to the coronavirus.
Urban Dove, a charter school relocated to a building owned by a historic synagogue, has won over wary neighbors. But a fatal shooting of a student last year reignited persistent opposition.
A Brooklyn mother’s search for a Lakota instructor leads her to the Language Conservancy, an organization teaching Native languages even after being condemned by the Sioux Nation’s leading council earlier this month.
The demand for food resources continues to grow for many New Yorkers, but closures of community run pantries have resulted in difficulty accessing food banks.
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The promise of more than $7 billion in federal COVID relief funding for New York City schools inspired some families and educators to dream big.
Twenty Bronx tenants will participate in a hot environmental experiment for the next six months.
With three in four shelter applications rejected, advocates demand permanent adoption of a pandemic pause on children cycling in and out of a Bronx intake center.
Homeless families are getting city decisions to deny shelter overturned in growing numbers — and applying over and over again.
These savvy centenarians have anchored communities and weathered crises from the Great Depression to COVID. Can they withstand further uncertainty?
The pandemic’s emotional strains are falling especially heavy on communities hit hardest by COVID, unemployment and child care challenges.
The Department of Education policy affects roughly 9,000 out of about 80,000 fifth graders who have siblings in the same grade or sixth grade.
Defense lawyers say the Staten Island case highlights the problem of having the NYPD handle emergency calls involving emotionally disturbed people.