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New York’s 100-Year-Old Businesses Offer Lessons in Survival

These savvy centenarians have anchored communities and weathered crises from the Great Depression to COVID. Can they withstand further uncertainty?

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Why Are Latina Moms in New York Reporting Such High Levels of Anxiety and Depression? 

The pandemic’s emotional strains are falling especially heavy on communities hit hardest by COVID, unemployment and child care challenges.

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These Are the 17 Victims of the Bronx Twin Parks Fire

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City to Make It Easier for Siblings to Attend Same Middle School

The Department of Education policy affects roughly 9,000 out of about 80,000 fifth graders who have siblings in the same grade or sixth grade.

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Former Nurse Faces Court Battle After Being Shot by Cops During Mental Health Crisis

Defense lawyers say the Staten Island case highlights the problem of having the NYPD handle emergency calls involving emotionally disturbed people.

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NYC Kids Can Get $100 for COVID Vaccine Shots at Elementary Schools

Following the recent federal emergency approval of the Pfizer vaccine for children ages 5 to 11, city officials are setting up one-day vaccine clinics at more than 1,000 school sites across the city that serve these students.

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City, Union Push Back on Informing Parents of Rights in Child-Welfare Probes

The Administration for Children’s Services and its staffers’ union may have successfully scuttled two City Council bills that would require workers to advise parents and other caretakers of their rights at the start of a welfare investigation.

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Will New York Require COVID Vaccines for Students? State Pediatricians Hope So.

The New York chapters of the American Academy of Pediatrics "unequivocally support" mandating COVID vaccines for students once the shot is fully federally approved for those younger than 16.

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Maya Wiley Won’t Be New York’s Next Mayor. What Will Happen to Her Signature Proposal?

After coming in third in the Democratic primary, Wiley says she plans to push for universal community care for children and older adults from outside the mayor’s — and governor’s – office. She’s hoping to get Eric Adams’ ear.

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Vaccinate Teens Without Parental Consent, City Child Welfare Agency Says

Lawyers for youth and families push back on new policy that allows foster care and juvenile justice homes to give vaccines to 16- and 17-year-olds even if mom or dad objects.

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How Towers Tragedy Reverberates in Staten Island, a Ferry Ride Away From Ground Zero

While the physical damage of the Trade Center attacks was concentrated in Lower Manhattan, the emotional fallout could be felt miles away in neighborhoods where victims had lived. In the city’s least populous borough, the loss is "ingrained in our DNA."

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Lessons From NYC’s Children of 9/11 Help the Kids of COVID as School Resumes

The terror attacks showed how schools can offer mental health support after an unprecedented crisis, experts say. But because no two disasters are the same, the city faces new challenges in helping students forever upended by the pandemic.

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School Policing Questioned as Students Return to Classrooms Amid Pandemic Stress and Security Revamp

The restarting of fully in-person classes means a comeback for thousands of school safety agents alongside a million students to city public schools in less than a month. That’s reignited a raging debate over what role cops should have in classrooms.

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Afghan New Yorkers Spring Into Action as Humanitarian Crisis Grows

The fall of Kabul has Afghans in New York mobilizing to help their families back home — along with any compatriots who may soon find themselves in the city. Some of the first refugees arrived at Kennedy Airport this week.

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How New Yorkers Can Help Haiti Following the Earthquake That Killed 1,300

Local activists and politicians are working to ensure that donations are sent to the right organizations. Many want to prevent a repeat of when the American Red Cross raised $500 million and only built six homes after the devastating 2010 quake.

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Some NYC Healthcare Workers Face Vaccine Requirements or Weekly Tests. Teachers Could Be Next

After announcing that certain healthcare workers would be required to get vaccinated or submit to weekly coronavirus testing, Mayor Bill de Blasio is now considering the same for other city workers, including teachers, he said Wednesday.

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De Blasio Promises Repairs to Decrepit and Dangerous Playgrounds

"We need these playgrounds fixed," he said after THE CITY reported more than one in 10 NYCHA playgrounds are shuttered because of unsafe conditions. Mayoral candidate Eric Adams called for swift repairs. But residents remained skeptical.

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Tears and Joy as Rikers Island Resumes In-Person Visits

The Department of Correction stopped visitation last spring at the beginning of the pandemic. Now family and friends of detainees are returning under a new system.

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Making a Stink About Lack of Bathrooms at Brooklyn’s Betsy Head Park

The Parks Department says real bathrooms will be completed next year. But there are no signs pointing out to port-a-potties blocks away from playgrounds and fields. "Why would they do this to families in Brownsville?" one woman asked.

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Brooklyn Doctor Under Investigation in Sha-asia Washington’s Death During Childbirth

Dr. Dmitry Anatolevich Shelchkov, a former Woodhull Hospital anesthesiologist, has been suspended pending the probe by the state Department of Health into the 26-year-old’s death last July.