Eric Adams

From sweeping definitions on what counts as a ‘sensitive location’ to new licensing requirements, Albany plans to test the Supreme Court’s recent decision. Some Second Amendment experts are skeptical.
In the wake of the Supreme Court decision striking down New York’s concealed carry law, the City Council is exploring one option: a law that would declare any area with more than 10,000 people per square mile a “sensitive location.”
Mayor refiles five years of financial disclosures after THE CITY found he’d never divested. And he still owns the Prospect Place co-op.
Mayor’s look at rule changes comes after THE CITY highlighted a newly enforced rule that prevents municipal workers from moonlighting — and two drownings on Rockaway Beach.
The new budget also significantly increases New York City’s “rainy day fund,” but will not be official (or detailed) until the Council’s vote next week.
But even as Mayor Adams lifted the mandate, he urged all New Yorkers to continue masking indoors.
“We’re not sleeping on this ruling,” the mayor told THE CITY, explaining how NYC could restrict firearms in certain sensitive places.
“You’re talking about DOI? I’m talking about DOA,” says mayor of Department of Investigation probe that found financial impropriety and nepotism at Andre Mitchell’s Man Up! organization.
Mayor outlines sweeping changes to make housing and other development easier. He’ll need to win over City Council members who just derailed 915 proposed new apartments in Harlem.
State lawmakers strike a deal to give NYC’s mayor just half the four years he sought — and it’s tied to new checks on his power, as well as downsized classes.
Albany lawmakers are poised to approve a long-sought Preservation Trust to enable new investment in dilapidated housing projects — and Mayor Eric Adams says residents will have a say. The fine print is less clear.
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Citing THE CITY’s report on how subway stations become drug use sites when centers close, the mayor called the situation a crisis that can’t wait. But center operators say they need more funding.
Many parents and educators have urged return to instruction matching sounds to letters to teach kids to read, a move Mayor Eric Adams says will especially help kids with dyslexia and other learning challenges.
Fred Kreizman worked for mega-lobbyist Capalino and Associates on behalf of condo, warehouse and shelter developers until Eric Adams was inaugurated. Now he’s in charge of the mayor’s office that interacts with community boards and local concerns.
Mayor Eric Adams has pledged to open 1,400 shelter beds by mid-2023, a promise that’s farther away with the downtown closures.
Three years ago, the Department of Investigation recommended that the Department of Correction update its system of tracking violent incidents from old-school secret logbooks to a transparent digital system. Nothing has changed yet.
From union pay raises to borrowing costs to pension funds, the rising cost of doing business could upend the mayor’s nearly $100-billion spending plan.
The education panel rejected NYC’s funding formula in what is normally a routine vote. What does that mean for schools and the city?
Bolstered by higher than expected revenues, the mayor’s city spending plan adds money for a gun crime unit, correction officers, affordable housing, child care and more, while watchdogs urge more savings.
Mayor Eric Adams and Comptroller Brad Lander join forces to say they will not put city deposits into accounts with the financial giant, after advocates point to disproportionate denials of mortgages to Black applicants.