Environment

The Senate’s $433 billion Inflation Reduction Act marks the most significant federal action on climate change yet. What does it mean locally?
A recent beach closure over bacteria highlights that New Yorkers don’t always know what they’re swimming in.
It’s good news-bad news as sharks, dolphins, whales and turtles swarm New York City.
On July 31, the Sanitation Department will begin issuing fines between $250 and $1,000 for establishments that don’t separate and process their organic waste, officials say.
In the face of a dire lifeguard shortage, the parks department has gotten approval to truncate the exam required to patrol the city’s smaller watering holes.
Between downpours of rainwater and storm surges from the ocean, the potential for future flooding near the coasts and further inland is high.
Dozens of applicants who’d previously failed the qualifying tests were sent automated text messages this week from the Parks Department gauging their interest in taking a new accelerated class to become lifeguards.
They all say that state lawmakers need to take more aggressive action to green the electric grid and protect communities — and contend it is the Assembly that has failed in recent legislative sessions.
The State Senate and Assembly were able to combine for action on cryptocurrency, thermal energy and electronics repair.
Legislation that got through the State Senate and Assembly in early May would make it harder for polluting facilities to move into poor and minority neighborhoods that have traditionally been dumping grounds.
The Department of Environmental Protection has floated the biggest rate hike since 2014. The public is invited to weigh in two days this week.
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One house was rebuilt, one propped up on stilts, and one given back to nature.
Mirroring the East Coast Resiliency Project but with less of a fight — so far — the Battery Park City Authority plans to guard the neighborhood from flooding by raising Wagner Park over 10 feet higher than it is now.
At the Brooklyn base of the Kosciuszko Bridge a gleaming new park attracts visitors from around the world. On the Queens side they have anger and frustration.
Those who flock to the sands of Bay 1 on Riis beach — including a historically Black and brown community of trans and queer sunbathers — fear tearing down a long-abandoned medical center that acted as a shield will ruin their “utopia.”
Many environmental and labor leaders pitch New York’s clean energy transition as a way to employ young and marginalized people — little consolation to workers in fossil-fuel industries worried about job loss.
Under New York’s sweeping climate law, certain neighborhoods are guaranteed to get attention and money if they qualify as disadvantaged. Find out how to check your block’s designation — and weigh in on the process.
It’ll take a small town’s supply of juice to fuel the hundreds of emissions-free coaches the MTA plans to add to its 5,800-strong fleet. Not to mention all the depots that will have to be modified and workers retrained.
Under a legislative proposal due for introduction next week, all New Yorkers would be required to separate their food scraps and set it on their curbs for pickup. The city’s Independent Budget Office estimates a citywide composting program could save $33 million annually — after five years.
A bill introduced Monday by Assemblymember Marcela Mitaynes (D-Brooklyn) is looking to limit pollution from truck and van exhaust associated with local deliveries from online retailers like Amazon.
One line will bring down dam-generated electricity from Quebec, and another will feed the city with solar, wind and hydropower-created juice from Upstate. Without them, state and city climate targets were merely a pipe dream.