Environment

See shells journey from dinner plates to docks as environmentalists and restaurateurs use mollusks to boost local ecology.
Local Law 97, passed by the City Council in 2019, puts carbon caps on all buildings bigger than 25,000 square feet. With the exact rules still in draft form, landlords are trying to figure out what they need to do now.
A court-ordered timeline for fixing boilers and elevators and eliminating toxins and pests is imperiled by a gigantic deficit in rental revenue, says the housing authority.
The Army Corps of Engineers’ planned gates, meant to protect against future Sandy-like storms could help reduce moon-cycle deluges in oceanside neighborhoods. But some worry that they are not meant for such tidal use.
A law from last fall required a comprehensive citywide plan to deal with climate change, but observers say what the Adams administration came up with is hardly what’s needed.
Thanks to the utility company not submitting proper data, hundreds of locations that received F’s may not deserve them.
Cross Bay Boulevard, a main evacuation route for residents of Broad Channel, is still in bad shape a decade after Superstorm Sandy.
If enacted, the proposals would boost spending on environmental projects, define how the city calculates the cost of living and create a new racial equity office.
The move is expected to help bring New York closer to compliance with Local Law 97, which sets limits on building emissions starting in 2024.
With roots in Occupy Wall Street, the spontaneous relief effort showcased how mutual aid groups can step into the breach when traditional organizations are slow to act.
The moon helped spare some vulnerable coastal areas in 2012, and they’re still struggling to get attention and funding a decade later.
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Residents say they fear more pollution in an area that was hit hard by 9/11 and COVID-19 and are demanding a new environmental assessment that factors in the pandemic.
Nearing the 10th anniversary of deadly Superstorm Sandy, the city comptroller examines how much federal money various agencies have spent on rebuilding and resilience.
A Parks Department nonprofit offers a fast track for requests to plant street saplings. Meanwhile, backups grow longer.
On Thursday, the Department of Buildings released a series of draft rules that regulate how property owners are able to comply with Local Law 97.
When the sibling owners of Dragonetti Brothers Landscaping were indicted in an insurance scam last year, tree maintenance in Brooklyn and Queens was put on hold. But the city Department of Investigation is working with Parks officials to rev up the chainsaws again.
This summer, 725 people visited city emergency rooms — that’s almost 13% more than during the same period in 2021, and nearly as many as in 2018.
Construction on the $52 billion project is expected to begin in 2030 — but first it has to get through a public comment period and then be approved by a gauntlet of federal, state and local officials.
On eve of a Council investigative hearing, sources say weeks went by without action, even as tenants filed dozens of complaints of foul, cloudy water.
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