Economy

The less than a decade-old public square in Queens has seen a surge in activity as the pandemic forced immigrant families out of steady jobs and into street sales.
New comptroller numbers suggest City Hall will have to restore several billion dollars to keep retirees’ benefit investments replenished, as stock performance lags projections.
Tracking our pandemic recovery
The unemployment rate edged up to 6.2%, but a recession could be around the corner.
Hundreds of new vendor permits per year were supposed to be available starting July 1, but the details of the new process are still simmering with the Department of Health.
City comptroller reports estimated income tax payments are down by nearly one-third, driven by sharp drops in Wall Street capital gains.
Hotel occupancy has rebound to near pre-pandemic levels, but jobs in the leisure and hospitality sector remain far below pre-pandemic levels.
Economic leaders are grappling toward breakthrough ideas for how to reboot the city for a post-pandemic world. An Adams-Hochul panel promises concrete plans by October.
It’s yet another troubling sign for the city’s economic recovery, with Black workers disproportionately affected.
With little guidance from officials, some restaurants are racking up tickets or abandoning the sidewalk sheds that helped keep them afloat during the pandemic. Meanwhile, residents have complained about trash, rodents and a lack of street parking.
Data tracking entries into private office buildings showed a 5% bump in who’s showing up in person for work, a notable boost from the previous week.
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Mayor outlines sweeping changes to make housing and other development easier. He’ll need to win over City Council members who just derailed 915 proposed new apartments in Harlem.
The city added 25,000 jobs in April, with a boost from resurgent tourism — but growth remains at half the national rate, while unemployment remains nearly double.
Proposed state-backed banks could help poor New Yorkers get accounts and loans. A lot of Democrats are on board, so why isn’t Andrea Stewart-Cousins convinced yet?
An audit by the agency’s inspector general, launched after a report by THE CITY, found that customers paid “totally indefensible” prices.
A market meltdown will have an outsized impact on the state budget, and job losses in the city’s vital tech sector loom.
The nearly 400-foot towers originally had the backing of Rev. Al Sharpton and the promise of a civil rights museum but was vehemently opposed by local elected officials worried about more gentrification in the area.
From union pay raises to borrowing costs to pension funds, the rising cost of doing business could upend the mayor’s nearly $100-billion spending plan.
Bolstered by higher than expected revenues, the mayor’s city spending plan adds money for a gun crime unit, correction officers, affordable housing, child care and more, while watchdogs urge more savings.
The lifeblood of New York’s economy, small entrepreneurs say they need more assistance and less bureaucratic red tape.
NYC unemployment dropped to 6.5% as the service industry continued to add jobs.