Economy

Tracking our pandemic recovery
Mayor suggests the post-9/11 evolution of FiDi may be a blueprint for rebuilding momentum for Midtown and other business districts as workers continue Zooming in to work part-time.
Now gaining speed, the plan to toll drivers traveling into Manhattan could threaten the existence of several parking facilities south of 60th Street.
The mayor on Tuesday briefed the Financial Control Board, created to steer the city out of the 1970s fiscal crisis but now powerless to intervene.
Now that a planned ice skating project is officially over, people who live and work in the neighborhood want to participate in creating the next project from the start.
These three sectors explain why NYC just can’t get its groove back.
Local unemployment remains over 6%, with fewer jobs than existed in February 2020.
Councilmember Marjorie Velazquez is against the Bruckner Boulevard upzoning, for now. That could prevent the land use proposal near a Super Foodtown from moving forward.
The less than a decade-old public square in Queens has seen a surge in activity as the pandemic forced immigrant families out of steady jobs and into street sales.
New comptroller numbers suggest City Hall will have to restore several billion dollars to keep retirees’ benefit investments replenished, as stock performance lags projections.
The unemployment rate edged up to 6.2%, but a recession could be around the corner.
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Hundreds of new vendor permits per year were supposed to be available starting July 1, but the details of the new process are still simmering with the Department of Health.
City comptroller reports estimated income tax payments are down by nearly one-third, driven by sharp drops in Wall Street capital gains.
Hotel occupancy has rebound to near pre-pandemic levels, but jobs in the leisure and hospitality sector remain far below pre-pandemic levels.
Economic leaders are grappling toward breakthrough ideas for how to reboot the city for a post-pandemic world. An Adams-Hochul panel promises concrete plans by October.
It’s yet another troubling sign for the city’s economic recovery, with Black workers disproportionately affected.
With little guidance from officials, some restaurants are racking up tickets or abandoning the sidewalk sheds that helped keep them afloat during the pandemic. Meanwhile, residents have complained about trash, rodents and a lack of street parking.
Data tracking entries into private office buildings showed a 5% bump in who’s showing up in person for work, a notable boost from the previous week.
Mayor outlines sweeping changes to make housing and other development easier. He’ll need to win over City Council members who just derailed 915 proposed new apartments in Harlem.
The city added 25,000 jobs in April, with a boost from resurgent tourism — but growth remains at half the national rate, while unemployment remains nearly double.
Proposed state-backed banks could help poor New Yorkers get accounts and loans. A lot of Democrats are on board, so why isn’t Andrea Stewart-Cousins convinced yet?