Department of Education

State lawmakers strike a deal to give NYC’s mayor just half the four years he sought — and it’s tied to new checks on his power, as well as downsized classes.
The education panel rejected NYC’s funding formula in what is normally a routine vote. What does that mean for schools and the city?
Just over one-third of eligible students are expected to get extra tutoring and services — with many sitting out because of transportation problems, too-long school days or schools phasing out sessions.
P.S. 9 in Prospect Heights, now the Sarah Smith Garnet School, removes its last vestige of the Bergen name — though it remains on street signs and subway stations.
Graduation rates in New York City ticked up to 81% last school year, about 2 percentage points higher than the previous year.
De Blasio reverses plan to eliminate high school geographic priorities and zones, after families expressed concerns about potentially long commutes.
The impact of child welfare investigations on already traumatized families can be severe: charges stay on records for decades and may affect future job prospects. Parents say they are trying their best to keep their kids safe and educated.
The nearly quarter billion-dollar effort to help special education students catch-up after more than 1 ½ years of pandemic disruptions gets pushed off to December — taking parents by surprise and causing added turmoil well into the 2021-2022 school year.
After a spate of incidents involving students allegedly bringing guns into school buildings, Mayor Bill de Blasio is deploying additional metal detectors to campuses and extra police officers.
New York City will no longer test rising kindergartners for entry into its gifted and talented program, which has long attracted controversy for enrolling starkly low numbers of Black and Latino students.
As the vaccine mandate for New York City teachers is set to take effect next week, schools are bracing for this Tuesday when thousands of educators might be barred from their classrooms.
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School started Monday in New York, but some students who need free MetroCards to travel to and from class are still waiting to receive them. That’s raising concerns among some principals that students could end up in trouble with the police.
Eating at an indoor restaurant is limited to those who have been fully vaccinated. But in classrooms, many students remain too young for vaccines. Experts warn that lunchtime could be the riskiest part of the school day.
With less than three weeks remaining before schools reopen for a million students, New York City officials on Thursday revealed a suite of safety protocols including coronavirus testing and classroom closure policies.
New York City schools will stick with universal masking for now, despite new federal guidance that OKs ditching face coverings for vaccinated students and teachers, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday.
New numbers show how many students are locked out by the system
The pod concept is expanding beyond families with means. More schools, churches and community groups are trying to level the field by offering students of all incomes the in-person, small-group option as remote learning leaves many behind.
The city Department of Education is launching a mental health training program in May for parents, paying them $500 to become “wellness ambassadors” in their communities.
A trend of parent-driven surveys has emerged during the pandemic. This has helped fill a gap, say parents who are finding it easier to connect online and share information.
Here’s how some families are weighing the decision about whether to return kids to their physical classrooms.
City Council members are considering a slate of bills Thursday meant to significantly change the role of school policing.