Criminal Justice

When THE CITY highlighted Kareem Mayo’s plight — stuck in jail after being freed from a two-decade stint on murder charges — officials started making calls and got him sprung.
Kareem Mayo should be happily back home with his grandkids right now but administrative delays over leg-monitor paperwork have him stewing in Rikers.
People who survived solitary confinement at Rikers describe the horrific conditions and mental anguish that extreme isolation can cause. Until recently, New York City had nearly a thousand such “punitive segregation” cells.
A detainee who was attacked on Rikers Island, a former jail mental health counselor, a former commissioner, and a juvenile detention manager: All weigh in on the crisis and what can be done.
Bishop Lamor Whitehead is also accused of extorting a businessman and lying to FBI agents.
Public defender groups want the Department of Correction to pay $250 for each detainee denied scheduled treatment at clinics and hospitals.
Scheduled to begin next month, the switch takes power away from the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice, an agency that greatly expanded under the de Blasio administration.
Prosecutors cited alleged threats to Comptroller Brad Lander’s staff, in rare city use of state law that allows authorities to remove firearms from people considered potential risks for violence
The allegations had previously been dismissed by the NYPD and the Staten Island District Attorney’s Office despite explosive video footage from two separate car stops in Staten Island in 2018.
Last December, the governor said she would change the way pardons and clemency applications were handled. But little has changed since.
A broad coalition of groups plan to rally Dec. 15 for a proposed bill that would prevent cops from interrogating minors without counsel or taking them to a precinct without consulting parents first.
GOT A TIP?
We’re here to listen. Email tips@thecity.nyc or visit our tips page for other ways to share.
With high-maintenance retail outlets slow to open, state fast-tracks launch of courier services.
Julio Medina, the founder of Exodus Transitional Community, resigns as the nonprofit faces five separate investigations.
Julio Medina quietly resigned his role on the panel that oversees city jails, THE CITY has learned, as his group that provides post-incarceration services faces new scrutiny.
Nearly two years after the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes began giving grants to community groups, they can’t say who’s received that money or what it’s achieved.
A friend of Frank Carone got wind of the secret decision made by a judicial advisory panel.
Apart from the obvious privacy and intimacy issues that come with reading everyone’s letters and turning them into emails, experts note that similar efforts in other states haven’t reduced contraband.
In a new lawsuit, the family of deceased Rikers detainee Segundo Guallpa allege that corrections officers failed to check on him, and that at least one falsified paperwork claiming that she had.
It’s the latest blow to the troubled nonprofit, which had several workers escorted out of the city jail.
Correction Department Commissioner Louis Molina wants to keep people in punitive segregation locked in their cells for longer — even as Rikers reformers are looking to end the practice entirely.
It’s been slow going so far for a plan that a judge will assess in November while deciding whether or not to take away control of the city’s jails.