Courts

When the sibling owners of Dragonetti Brothers Landscaping were indicted in an insurance scam last year, tree maintenance in Brooklyn and Queens was put on hold. But the city Department of Investigation is working with Parks officials to rev up the chainsaws again.
The lawsuit against McKinsey & Co. was filed on behalf of the health and welfare funds of dozens of construction trade and other unions.
“They don’t need a license. Anyone can do it. They’re not regulated unless the attorney general has the time to crack down on them. And they can’t go after everybody because it’s like whack-a-mole, right?”
The ruling, which isn’t binding on other judges but will surely be noted by them, was based on the 2019 bail reform law’s requirement judges consider “ability to post bail without posing undue hardship.”
The decades-old shelter policy would have to go back to court to be undone, experts say.
Johnnie Jackson has lived in his family’s St. Albans home for most of his life and owned it for nearly 30 years. First a convicted mortgage scammer took it from him, now a bank is still trying to snatch the property.
Many seeking religious exemptions have cited fetal tissue research and declining COVID numbers as a reason to keep their jobs, but spiritual leaders and health experts argue otherwise.
Bypassing primaries, Democratic Party officials ‘backfill’ Civil Court candidates who have no chance of losing.
Rikers Island was designed to hold people accused of crimes less than a year. Why have some detainees been there for six, eight and even 10 years?
The former lieutenant governor on Wednesday will ask a federal judge to dismiss charges arising from a campaign matching-funds scheme first exposed by THE CITY.
At the Kings County party convention last week, a dozen nominees got named by acclamation. Behind the scenes, conflicts almost came to blows.
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Not only was John Teixeria granted a rare “medical parole” in January 2020 but he’s also received standard parole every six months since then. But state prison officials say they have no place to send him in his condition.
The ruling means that until the City Council revisits the budget, New York City must fund the school system at the same levels it did last fiscal year.
Michael Lopez’s mom tells THE CITY he was a good kid with psychiatric needs that were not being met behind bars. And she questions how he was able to get his hands on the drugs he apparently OD’d on.
Court papers claim $90,000 disappeared after Lamor Whitehead promised to help buy real estate, while he ran a failed campaign for Brooklyn borough president last year.
Judicial candidates, who could make almost $3 million over a term, collectively gave more than $100,000 in political donations to party leaders and clubs. That’s legal, thanks to New York’s “stupid law.”
A Brooklyn gang first gained control of First Response Cleaning in 2019, and then used the company to extort competitors and muscle the industry with violence and threats, according to a federal indictment.
At a grassroots level, New York advocates have long been doing what they can to help people from other states where abortion is effectively unavailable. Now, they’re ready to do even more.
From laws shielding abortion providers from extradition, arrest and malpractice suits to increased funding and security for clinics, Albany and City Hall made it clear that New York will remain a safe haven.
One married couple running separately in Manhattan and Brooklyn represent half of all competitive races for Civil Court in New York City this primary election.
Minnesota-based lender OSK says the New York Taxi Workers Alliance has “stopped” interfering — but the drivers’ union still labels the suit “baseless.”