Climate Change

The city’s longest-ever stretch without snow previously ran from 2019 to the end of 2020. We matched and exceeded that record at the beginning of 2022.
In a pilot program at NYCHA, households with induction stoves showed a 35% decrease in nitrogen dioxide and a nearly 43% difference in carbon monoxide.
A series of renderings offer a glimpse at a proposal that could be what a resiliency expert called “the largest transformation of our waterfront since the Robert Moses era.”
Finally armed with a roadmap for how to achieve the environmental mandates outlined by a sweeping new state law, it’s now up to legislators to advance those policies.
Water tables that rise with sea levels can inundate basements, ruin underground infrastructure and render anti-flooding strategies ineffective. After a nearly decade-long hiatus, the feds are starting up monitoring again.
If you’re concerned about health or climate and considering ditching the gas in your kitchen, we explain the options, whether you rent or own.
Concerns about breaking good habits and overflowing landfills are clouding otherwise sunny outcomes for popular program that’s gone on a winter break after just starting last fall.
A combination of climate change and drought risk could turn Philadelphia’s drinking water salty — and New York’s fresh water supply may be needed to help head off a crisis.
The blueprint to slash carbon emissions and usher New York into a less fossil fuel dependent future gives Albany policymakers strategies for hitting targets decades away.
A group of Battery Park City residents went to court to stop the coastal protection project that would raze then raise Wagner Park. The state agency in charge agreed to hold off its construction.
Without flood-protected chargers, the study says the MTA could lose $945,000 per day from loss of service on the B32 bus and another $10.4 million per day from the M42 bus crossing Manhattan from West 42nd to East 41st Street.
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Local Law 97, passed by the City Council in 2019, puts carbon caps on all buildings bigger than 25,000 square feet. With the exact rules still in draft form, landlords are trying to figure out what they need to do now.
The Army Corps of Engineers’ planned gates, meant to protect against future Sandy-like storms could help reduce moon-cycle deluges in oceanside neighborhoods. But some worry that they are not meant for such tidal use.
A law from last fall required a comprehensive citywide plan to deal with climate change, but observers say what the Adams administration came up with is hardly what’s needed.
Millions are still in dispute between builders and the city’s construction agency, after federal funds to fix homes dried up.
Councilmember Lincoln Restler wants to cover his district with saplings, from Boerum Hill to Greenpoint
Cross Bay Boulevard, a main evacuation route for residents of Broad Channel, is still in bad shape a decade after Superstorm Sandy.
The move is expected to help bring New York closer to compliance with Local Law 97, which sets limits on building emissions starting in 2024.
With roots in Occupy Wall Street, the spontaneous relief effort showcased how mutual aid groups can step into the breach when traditional organizations are slow to act.
Gleaming new high-rise towers, built to the latest standards, stand alongside older family homes, badly in need of retrofitting. Climate change puts both at risk — although on starkly different timetables.