Climate Change

This summer, 725 people visited city emergency rooms — that’s almost 13% more than during the same period in 2021, and nearly as many as in 2018.
Construction on the $52 billion project is expected to begin in 2030 — but first it has to get through a public comment period and then be approved by a gauntlet of federal, state and local officials.
While officials work toward sewer and drain upgrades and ‘green infrastructure’ to absorb water, people in at-risk neighborhoods know they are vulnerable.
Flooded out of their homes, people who can’t find new housing — even while being helped by city agencies — illustrate the urgency of the affordable housing crisis.
Elected officials vow there’s hope on the horizon, but many of the soaked suffering are too exhausted to pursue complicated efforts to get compensation.
A crowd came to the defense of Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park on the eve of a project to elevate the public space to withstand rising New York Harbor waters.
A crumbling expressway, the threat of rising seas and missing funding for NYCHA: the problems vexing NY-10 and how the area’s next U.S. Representative could help
The idea’s been kicked around by politicians and transit advocates for years but never tried in the U.S. Here’s a guide on what it all means, whom it will affect — and when we may actually see it in New York.
It’s good news-bad news as sharks, dolphins, whales and turtles swarm New York City.
On July 31, the Sanitation Department will begin issuing fines between $250 and $1,000 for establishments that don’t separate and process their organic waste, officials say.
Between downpours of rainwater and storm surges from the ocean, the potential for future flooding near the coasts and further inland is high.
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They all say that state lawmakers need to take more aggressive action to green the electric grid and protect communities — and contend it is the Assembly that has failed in recent legislative sessions.
The State Senate and Assembly were able to combine for action on cryptocurrency, thermal energy and electronics repair.
Legislation that got through the State Senate and Assembly in early May would make it harder for polluting facilities to move into poor and minority neighborhoods that have traditionally been dumping grounds.
The Department of Environmental Protection has floated the biggest rate hike since 2014. The public is invited to weigh in two days this week.
One house was rebuilt, one propped up on stilts, and one given back to nature.
Mirroring the East Coast Resiliency Project but with less of a fight — so far — the Battery Park City Authority plans to guard the neighborhood from flooding by raising Wagner Park over 10 feet higher than it is now.
Many environmental and labor leaders pitch New York’s clean energy transition as a way to employ young and marginalized people — little consolation to workers in fossil-fuel industries worried about job loss.
Under New York’s sweeping climate law, certain neighborhoods are guaranteed to get attention and money if they qualify as disadvantaged. Find out how to check your block’s designation — and weigh in on the process.
It’ll take a small town’s supply of juice to fuel the hundreds of emissions-free coaches the MTA plans to add to its 5,800-strong fleet. Not to mention all the depots that will have to be modified and workers retrained.
Under a legislative proposal due for introduction next week, all New Yorkers would be required to separate their food scraps and set it on their curbs for pickup. The city’s Independent Budget Office estimates a citywide composting program could save $33 million annually — after five years.