Civilian Complaint Review Board

Lt. Eric Dym, who retired in the face of stiff penalties, asks critics: “What do you want to see?” They have some words for him.
An audit by the state comptroller documents growing lags in investigating civilian complaints, in part due to delays from the NYPD — and the problem is only getting worse.
Lt. Eric Dym faced discipline on 52 allegations, but he won’t be terminated for misconduct. Only one CCRB probe in the past decade has led to that outcome — for the officer who killed Eric Garner.
In its first report since the pandemic began, the Commission to Combat Police Corruption says several cops who should have been fired for terrible behavior and lies were allowed to keep their jobs.
Internal analysis found 585 allegations from 2014 to mid-2020 in which Civilian Complaint Review Board investigators confirmed police misconduct — but the board voted to clear the cops of wrongdoing.
The NYPD leader and four deputies accumulated at least one allegation substantiated by the Civilian Complaint Review Board — and so did his predecessor, James O’Neill. Some of incidents recall the height of stop-and-frisk.
A departmental trial judge found the officer guilty of misconduct in the incident outside the Mobb Deep rapper’s wake. Police Commissioner Dermot Shea overturned the verdict. The video was released after THE CITY pressed Mayor de Blasio.
A federal appeals panel dismissed union arguments of potential harm to cops. Now the city awaits the final OK to unleash potentially explosive documents — including complaints against the NYPD’s last two commissioners.
Under new agreement between the NYPD and its civilian watchdog, most police officers found to have used the illegal, potentially deadly maneuver will be terminated — a tougher penalty than first proposed.
More than six years after the police killing of Eric Garner, officers with substantiated claims of abuse go without any meaningful punishment.
GOT A TIP?
We’re here to listen. Email tips@thecity.nyc or visit our tips page for other ways to share.
Civilian Complaint Review Board move to investigate allegations ranging from verbal harassment to rape gets backing from legal groups and survivor advocates — and a warning from police unions that the oversight board is crossing a line.
Civilian Complaint Review Board seeks public comment on proposed push to probe cops accused of sexually offensive or abusive behavior, after police-union pushback derailed efforts.
The NYPD has regularly failed to turn over key records and videos to police abuse investigators at New York’s Civilian Complaint Review Board. “This just seems like contempt,” said the now-retired judge who ordered the NYPD to use body cameras.
Donovan Richards, whose committee monitors public safety, says the time is wrong for to shrink the Civilian Complaint Review Board.
THE CITY has obtained more than 250 civilian reports alleging police abuses, from bullying to brutality. Read details from some of the records law enforcement groups are waging a court battle to keep confidential.
While all citizens have the right to remain silent in the face of police questioning, children are often denied that privilege. Stalled state bills aimed to give youth more protection.
The city’s four police unions have scoffed at allowing their members to be questioned remotely by the Civilian Complaint Review Board during the pandemic.
The Civilian Complaint Review board will start remote questioning of cops later this month, starting with protester complaints — but officer unions say don’t expect cooperation.
The Civilian Complaint Review Board’s first-ever report on the police department’s treatment of young people shows wide race and gender gaps in who files charges.
Two NYPD officers with a history of complaints were among officers who allegedly stopped and manhandled teens brothers over a Disney-themed backpack.