Civic Newsroom

A place for THE CITY to encourage and inform engagement in local politics and the electoral process.

After Benjamin’s arrest by the feds and resignation, here’s what you need to know about the 2022 race for the state’s second-highest office.
Kathy Hochul is hoping to win a full term, but other Democrats are lining up for a primary challenge. And Republicans have been campaigning and raising cash for months before she took over from Andrew Cuomo.
Congressional and state seats have changed. Before the 2022 summer primary elections, find out who’s running and how your old districts stack up with your new ones.
The Rent Guidelines Board will hold two public hearings in June before a final vote on rent regulated lease renewals. Here’s how to testify.
When Albany’s “independent” commission failed to come up with legislative maps everyone could agree on earlier this year, Democrats controlling the Capitol took matters into their own hands. Republicans cried foul and two courts have partially agreed with them.
They’re volunteer positions with a history in patronage politics. Today, district leaders influence who can be judges, poll workers and members of each borough’s county committee.
Speaker Adrienne Adams will use the Council’s central fund to pay rent at members’ district offices, freeing up money to dedicate to staff and the community.
The street-crime police units are back under Mayor Adams with a new name. Officials say they will be looking for guns in 30 precincts. Can you record them on your phone? Do they have to provide ID? We answer these questions and more.
Join THE CITY’s Open Newsroom for an off-the-record conversation with housing experts as we talk about rent hikes, ERAP, evictions and more.
The backlog is thousands deep, and even those who got approved for funds have hit snags. Here’s your ERAP update from THE CITY’s Rent Updates newsletter.
More than 400,000 customers in the New York City area are at least two months behind on their bills. Here’s some quick info that may help if you’re one of them.
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A number of agencies, boards and committees look out for corruption and malfeasance in municipal life but their investigation and enforcement powers vary.
Households in New York City are seeing big spikes in what they’re being charged this month, even though many aren’t using significantly more juice. We explain why, and what you can do.
They’re the entry level of local government, but what do community boards really do? And how are members chosen? It’s application season, so here’s a guide for anyone who wants to get involved.
New York gets a new mayor, a fresh City Council, new political district lines and a bunch of regulations for legal weed. Here’s what the headlines might be about in the new year.
A big shake-up in the governor’s race has rattled the field for attorney general — and could we have two City Council speakers? What’s going on? Find out in our latest Civic Newsroom report.
Letitia James says she’ll run for reelection after all — after nixing a nascent run for governor. Here’s who’s also in the running so far for the state’s top prosecutor, with an overview of what an attorney general does.
Here’s what to know about who’s running for the Council’s top job, how the secret campaign process unfolds and why New Yorkers should care — even if they don’t get a say on who it will be.
Here’s the latest on the results, what the mayor-elect is up to now, what the heck happened with those ballot questions — and how New York’s political district lines will get drawn next year.
Voters appear to have enshrined environmental rights in the state Constitution. But early results show they may have nixed making it easier to vote and changing the redistricting process. Meanwhile, a measure to expand Civil Court cases seemed headed for an OK.