City Hall

Nearly two years after the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes began giving grants to community groups, they can’t say who’s received that money or what it’s achieved.
NYCFC will be crossing from The Bronx to Queens for a new soccer stadium that will be coupled with 2,500 so-called affordable housing units, local electeds and developers are expected to announce Wednesday.
A law from last fall required a comprehensive citywide plan to deal with climate change, but observers say what the Adams administration came up with is hardly what’s needed.
The city will bring in eight lawyers, paid for by their private firms but listed as employees of NYC, to plug a shortage. Critics say it’s just a drop in the bucket.
City Council must enable budget-cutting new health insurance options for retirees, warns Eric Adams’ chief labor negotiator — or City Hall will eliminate existing insurance plans.
Evolv Technology scanner misses aluminum tubes, even as it sounds alarms for umbrellas, reviews by a tech group and THE CITY found. A deputy mayor’s schedules show repeated meetings with the company.
It’s a longtime tradition for top leaders in New York’s public sector jobs to stack up vacation days for years and retire with big checks.
E-bike and phone chargers are coming soon to City Hall Park and other spots, after drivers for companies like Grubhub and DoorDash dreamed of having warm places to pause between runs.
The cancellation of a proposed cost-saving health plan after retired city workers sued could drain a special fund City Hall and unions use to pay employee benefits.
With a lawsuit slowing things down, insurers Elevance Health and Empire BlueCross BlueShield have pulled out of a controversial deal to change retired municipal employees’ Senior Care to a privately run plan “given the level of uncertainty at this time.”
Hundreds of thousands of city workers and their dependents could have their healthcare shifted to a cheaper plan by 2024, documents show.
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Board of Health, City Planning Commission and mayor’s charity are among bodies citing pandemic as reason they must Zoom, even after mayor’s office reaffirmed full-time office mandate for city workers.
Pointing to higher-than-predicted tax revenues, the city’s chief fiscal officer will urge the mayor and City Council to adopt a savings formula to ensure funds to weather recessions.
Fred Kreizman worked for mega-lobbyist Capalino and Associates on behalf of condo, warehouse and shelter developers until Eric Adams was inaugurated. Now he’s in charge of the mayor’s office that interacts with community boards and local concerns.
From union pay raises to borrowing costs to pension funds, the rising cost of doing business could upend the mayor’s nearly $100-billion spending plan.
Bolstered by higher than expected revenues, the mayor’s city spending plan adds money for a gun crime unit, correction officers, affordable housing, child care and more, while watchdogs urge more savings.
From tweaked tax returns to ethics advice given to top officials, the current mayor is breaking from predecessors’ practice of releasing records — and from his own promises to be open with New Yorkers.
Mayor Eric Adams and Comptroller Brad Lander join forces to say they will not put city deposits into accounts with the financial giant, after advocates point to disproportionate denials of mortgages to Black applicants.
Edu Hermelyn quit his job with the city public assistance agency within weeks, after THE CITY asked about his political post alongside spouse Rodneyse Bichotte. He’s now running for election.
City social service agency imposes limits on orders of fruits and vegetables under federally funded P-FRED initiative. “We didn’t hear anything,” says one volunteer.