City Hall

Hundreds of thousands of city workers and their dependents could have their healthcare shifted to a cheaper plan by 2024, documents show.
Board of Health, City Planning Commission and mayor’s charity are among bodies citing pandemic as reason they must Zoom, even after mayor’s office reaffirmed full-time office mandate for city workers.
Pointing to higher-than-predicted tax revenues, the city’s chief fiscal officer will urge the mayor and City Council to adopt a savings formula to ensure funds to weather recessions.
Fred Kreizman worked for mega-lobbyist Capalino and Associates on behalf of condo, warehouse and shelter developers until Eric Adams was inaugurated. Now he’s in charge of the mayor’s office that interacts with community boards and local concerns.
From union pay raises to borrowing costs to pension funds, the rising cost of doing business could upend the mayor’s nearly $100-billion spending plan.
Bolstered by higher than expected revenues, the mayor’s city spending plan adds money for a gun crime unit, correction officers, affordable housing, child care and more, while watchdogs urge more savings.
From tweaked tax returns to ethics advice given to top officials, the current mayor is breaking from predecessors’ practice of releasing records — and from his own promises to be open with New Yorkers.
Mayor Eric Adams and Comptroller Brad Lander join forces to say they will not put city deposits into accounts with the financial giant, after advocates point to disproportionate denials of mortgages to Black applicants.
Edu Hermelyn quit his job with the city public assistance agency within weeks, after THE CITY asked about his political post alongside spouse Rodneyse Bichotte. He’s now running for election.
City social service agency imposes limits on orders of fruits and vegetables under federally funded P-FRED initiative. “We didn’t hear anything,” says one volunteer.
GOT A TIP?
We’re here to listen. Email tips@thecity.nyc or visit our tips page for other ways to share.
Mayor Eric Adams has picked controversial former City Councilmember Laurie Cumbo to lead the Department of Cultural Affairs, according to people familiar with the appointment.
Edu Hermelyn, husband of Brooklyn Democratic Party chair Rodneyse Bichotte and a party leader himself, quits his paid position after THE CITY asked about rules forbidding dual government and political roles. Another top mayoral aide is taking leave to run against a Bichotte foe.
Twin Parks tenants now living in hotels had been getting hot meals delivered by the distinguished World Central Kitchen. But when that organization pivoted to Ukraine, a group run by a mayoral pal stepped in.
Court rules retirees can keep current insurance free of charge, as alternative to a planned cost-cutting transfer to Medicare Advantage.
More than $40,000 came from employees of New Jersey companies funded by Frank Carone, Adams’ chief of staff, that are now fighting a lawsuit alleging insurance fraud.
A slate of Mayor Eric Adams recent staff choices, two for faith-based jobs and one for the office of immigrant affairs, have problematic histories for the LGBTQ community.
Despite global spiritual leaders encouraging the jab, one Brooklyn rabbi said any colleague of his who rejects an exemption request “isn’t Jewish.”
Erick Salgado, a Brooklyn pastor who has spoken publicly against same-sex marriage, is going to be in charge of outreach for the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.
Broad cuts, and flat NYPD funding, meet new investments to fulfill campaign promises and promote equity.
Victor Calise, one of the city’s longest-serving commissioners, will leave his post March 4 to take a job in the private sector. New Yorkers living with physical and mental challenges see the opening as an opportunity for the office to do more.