Brooklyn

The commission charged with drawing new political boundaries for New York City’s legislative body will take input from the public through the end of August.
At the Kings County party convention last week, a dozen nominees got named by acclamation. Behind the scenes, conflicts almost came to blows.
As rent-stabilized tenants fear being displaced, the developer has offered only vague promises — and what residents see as ominous plans.
Bishop Lamor Whitehead declines to speak to THE CITY’s account of a parishioner who alleges he bilked her out of $90,000 — or about another $335,000 a judge ruled he owes a New Jersey business.
Court papers claim $90,000 disappeared after Lamor Whitehead promised to help buy real estate, while he ran a failed campaign for Brooklyn borough president last year.
Brooklyn’s largest hospital serving predominantly needy patients is besieged with demands for an overhaul, aimed at high-paid leadership.
DC 37 and other unions are steering clear of that jam-packed and wide-open race, THE CITY has learned, as well as the Nadler-Maloney showdown in Manhattan.
Judicial candidates, who could make almost $3 million over a term, collectively gave more than $100,000 in political donations to party leaders and clubs. That’s legal, thanks to New York’s “stupid law.”
The total number of private establishments in the city had its steepest drop in at least 30 years over the course of the pandemic as Manhattan couldn’t keep up making it but Brooklyn keeps on taking it.
Under the leadership of Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn, the borough’s party machine has been dogged by allegations of forgery and other fraudulent tactics aimed at undermining progressive adversaries.
“The need is overwhelming” but there are a limited number of funds going directly to refugees in search of housing, food and employment.
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Prosecutors allege that the scaffolding at 243 Fourth Avenue had been left unfastened for days, leading it to blow off and severely injure 32-year-old Haley Keating.
The borough’s political players hoped the Assemblymember would unite the party. Instead, as Democrats head into a vulnerable midterm election, New York’s biggest local political organization is in free fall.
Incumbents survived all but one challenge and progressive groups failed to make new gains — while outside spending failed to make a dent. More than $200,000 on one Bronx candidate yielded just 956 votes.
Insurgents won enough seats to threaten the leadership of Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn and the machine that helped elect Mayor Eric Adams. Among those defeated Tuesday: her husband, who resigned a $190,000 city job to run for district leader.
Bushwick’s Erik Dilan is benefiting from a blitz of literature trashing progressive Samir Nemir Olivares, who champions an anti-eviction bill and could become New York’s first genderqueer state lawmaker.
Displacement is “demoralizing” says one teacher departing from a Brooklyn middle school. On Friday, City Council members grilled education officials about why they’re shrinking needed resources.
Economic leaders are grappling toward breakthrough ideas for how to reboot the city for a post-pandemic world. An Adams-Hochul panel promises concrete plans by October.
A viral post of dilapidated pillars near the George Washington Bridge got New Yorkers wondering: How do you “say something” when you see iffy-looking infrastructure?
The Parks Department is facing a dire shortage of lifeguards for the city’s dozens of pools and beaches with just 480 certified guards.
Weeks-long gigs worth as much as $8,250 are getting reserved for campaign supporters and leadership allies — others need not apply.