clock menu more-arrow no yes

Bill de Blasio

Filed under:

Social Service Nonprofits Sue City Over Pro-Union Law

The Human Services Council, an umbrella group representing scores of nonprofits, has taken the unusual step of suing the city over a new law aimed at making it easier for their staffers to join a union.

Filed under:

End to Eviction Moratorium Will Stress-Test Tenants’ Right to a Lawyer

Bill de Blasio guaranteed Housing Court attorneys to all in need. That may not be enough when the eviction freeze expires as soon as Jan. 15.

Filed under:

Skylines and Streetscapes: How New York City Physically Changed in de Blasio Era

Supertalls proliferated. Cars gave way to busways. Outdoor dining everywhere. Nine neighborhoods have been rezoned. Here’s how the physical city morphed in the last eight years.

Filed under:

Subway Service Delays Feared as Omicron Hits the Express Track

The number of subway workers testing positive for COVID-19 has spiked, according to internal MTA data obtained by THE CITY. "It’s putting a tremendous strain on service, because you have so many absences," said one union official.

Filed under:

Special Education Tuition Hearings Shift to NYC Trials Agency in Push to Tackle Case Backlog

Filed under:

More COVID Testing Needed for New York’s Youngest Kids, Parents Plead

Elected officials slammed Mayor de Blasio Tuesday for closing 20 city-run sites before the Omicron surge and called on him to quickly increase testing capacity — especially for youngsters under 4. Meanwhile, the mayoral inauguration ceremony was postponed.

Filed under:

Checking Bill de Blasio’s Big Promises: THE CITY’s Scorecard on Eight Years of Ambitious Pledges

From affordable housing to waste reduction to high-paid jobs to commercial rent control, we look at where the results stand on some of the outgoing mayor’s major plans touted in annual State of the City and Earth Day addresses.

Filed under:

Some NYC Schools Shift to Remote Learning Option as COVID Surges Again

School leaders are taking matters into their own hands to respond to positive cases and staffing shortages. Meanwhile, calls are rising to increase COVID testing within schools as absence rates grow.

Filed under:

Long COVID Test Lines and Result Delays Frustrate New Yorkers as Mayor Eyes More Centers

De Blasio pledged on Monday to open 20 new fixed-location testing sites — as many as he shuttered in recent weeks. Meanwhile, throngs endured chilly slogs for tests and grappled with delayed or lost results as Omicron fueled record positive-case rates.

Filed under:

De Blasio Promises ‘More and More’ COVID Testing Centers After Closing 20

With Omicron propelling record infections and long pre-holiday lines outside testing facilities, the mayor and Mayor-elect Eric Adams scrambled to assure New Yorkers that we’ll get through the "fast and temporary phenomenon" of the variant.

GOT A TIP?

We’re here to listen. Email tips@thecity.nyc or visit our tips page for other ways to share.

Filed under:

Adams Vows to Bring Solitary Confinement Back to Rikers Island, Scrapping Reforms

"Enjoy the reprieve now!" the incoming mayor declared Thursday as he announced Louis Molina would head the Department of Correction. The family of Layleen Polanco, whose death at Rikers galvanized the anti-solitary movement, slammed Adams.

Filed under:

De Blasio’s SoHo Overhaul OK’d, Clearing Path for Affordable Housing and More Legal Artists’ Lofts

The City Council’s approval of the downtown Manhattan rezoning marked a late-term legacy victory in the mayor’s push to reshape one of the city’s whitest and wealthiest neighborhoods. Meanwhile, opponents fumed, even amid last-minute changes.

Filed under:

Time’s Up for Reform-Minded NYC Jails Boss Who Clashed With Unions: Sources

Correction Commissioner Vincent Schiraldi took the job running chaotic Rikers Island and other lockups in May hoping he would last beyond the de Blasio administration to see his policy changes through. But Mayor-elect Adams is replacing him.

Filed under:

Borough Presidents Demand Probe Into City Hall’s Shielding of Neighborhood COVID Death Data

Manhattan’s Gale Brewer and Queens’ Donovan Richards issue call for transparency after THE CITY revealed the de Blasio administration withheld a map tracking fatalities at the pandemic’s 2020 peak: "This information could have saved lives."

Filed under:

De Blasio Violated Fundraising Ethics Rules Even After Warning — Yet Mayor Faced No Penalty

Letters released after a protracted battle to shield them from public view show ethics board cited the mayor in 2014 and again in 2018 for asking real estate industry players with pending city business to give to his Campaign for One New York nonprofit.

Filed under:

City Hall Withheld COVID Neighborhood Death Data During NYC’s 2020 Pandemic Peak, Emails Show

The city Department of Health prepared a map breaking down COVID fatalities by ZIP code in early April 2020, just as New York was about to hit the height of deaths, THE CITY has learned. But the de Blasio administration delayed the information’s release for weeks.

Filed under:

For Final Budget Act, de Blasio Makes $4B in Red Ink Disappear — But Leaves Adams Billions of Worries

The mayor’s final fiscal projection still shows gaps of almost $8 billion for Eric Adams’ first term, provides no money to finance pay raises as contracts with municipal unions expire — and leaves the next administration facing a "fiscal cliff" of almost $2 billion.

Filed under:

The Toll of NYCHA’s Lead Lies, Part II: A Mother Fights for Truth as Daughter Struggles

Mikhaila Bonaparte, who lives in a Brooklyn public housing complex long ago deemed free of lead paint, recorded an off-the-charts blood lead level shortly before her third birthday. NYCHA denies there’s any lead in the apartment — even after health officials detected the toxin.

Filed under:

After Gowanus Overhaul and Blood Center Expansion Wins, de Blasio Turns to Reshaping SoHo

The City Council on Tuesday rezoned the Brooklyn neighborhood to create affordable housing, and OK’d plans for a life-sciences research hub on the Upper East Side. But a bigger battle over SoHo looms as the mayor’s term winds down.

Filed under:

Steve Banks Had Big Goals for Shelters, and Hit the Mark on Some. Should He Stay?

The city has now left all its notorious "cluster" shelter sites. Family homelessness is down. Eric Adams has hinted he likes the Department of Social Services commissioner. Is Banks ready for round two?