Seeking more vaccines and data, the caucus plans on Thursday to introduce a legislative package aimed at better addressing the city’s monkeypox outbreak.
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Fast food giant agrees to pay some 13,000 current and former employees to resolve city investigation of violations of local scheduling and sick leave laws.
Rarely are there two incumbents in one race. The challenger in New York’s new 12th Congressional District says it’s time for new energy in the House. Even many older New Yorkers agree — but still aren’t ready to give up on the political power of seniority.
At the Kings County party convention last week, a dozen nominees got named by acclamation. Behind the scenes, conflicts almost came to blows.
At one Bronx library, dozens daily are applying for city-issued identification cards in order to work locally after crossing the U.S. border 2,000 miles away.
The state transit agency is mulling regulation of e-scooters and e-bikes on trains and in stations following several deadly fires in the city caused by exploding lithium-ion batteries.
Not only was John Teixeria granted a rare “medical parole” in January 2020 but he’s also received standard parole every six months since then. But state prison officials say they have no place to send him in his condition.
THE CITY obtained a copy of a labor agreement that would give crews a long-due raise — but City Hall has not signed, despite months of urgings from Staten Island officials that preceded service disruptions.
The ruling means that until the City Council revisits the budget, New York City must fund the school system at the same levels it did last fiscal year.
Your guide to all things monkeypox — now a “public health emergency” in the city — from symptoms to where to get vaccinated.
The Texas governor made the announcement Friday in a provocation to Mayor Eric Adams, after previously targeting transports to Washington, D.C.
Charles Guria takes on the official watchdog job with a strong resume but a weak hand, as Department of Investigation records show limited compliance with past directives for change.
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For years, NYCHA management ignored a 2018 DOI recommendation to ban lithium-ion battery powered devices in public housing. Three people, including a 5-year-old girl today, have been killed in related fires since.
Immigrant families who’ve tried in vain to find their own apartments are at the breaking point — and showing up seeking homeless services after doubling up with family and friends.
And Queens passed Staten Island in 2020 as the borough with the lowest poverty rate, a new analysis by THE CITY shows.
More than half of all bus riders on Bx lines are hopping on for free, MTA data reveals, as commuters and transit experts say more rule enforcement is only part of the solution.
As rent-stabilized tenants fear being displaced, the developer has offered only vague promises — and what residents see as ominous plans.
The less than a decade-old public square in Queens has seen a surge in activity as the pandemic forced immigrant families out of steady jobs and into street sales.
New comptroller numbers suggest City Hall will have to restore several billion dollars to keep retirees’ benefit investments replenished, as stock performance lags projections.
Michael Lopez’s mom tells THE CITY he was a good kid with psychiatric needs that were not being met behind bars. And she questions how he was able to get his hands on the drugs he apparently OD’d on.
A new partnership between a food delivery giant and the advocacy group New Immigrant Community Empowerment falters after workers question who’s really in charge.
Bishop Lamor Whitehead declines to speak to THE CITY’s account of a parishioner who alleges he bilked her out of $90,000 — or about another $335,000 a judge ruled he owes a New Jersey business.
From grief camps to mentoring to financial aid, free resources are available to help young people weather devastating loss.
Court papers claim $90,000 disappeared after Lamor Whitehead promised to help buy real estate, while he ran a failed campaign for Brooklyn borough president last year.