Facebook Twitter

Did the Pandemic Affect Your NYC School’s State Test Scores? Find Out Here.

Use this searchable tool from our partners at Chalkbeat to find your school’s test scores.

SHARE Did the Pandemic Affect Your NYC School’s State Test Scores? Find Out Here.

Students sat farther apart than last year, at the start of the school year at One World Middle School in the Bronx, Oct. 1, 2020.

Michael Appleton/Mayor’s Office

This story was originally published by Chalkbeat. Sign up for their newsletters at ckbe.at/newsletters.

New York City officials released state test scores on Wednesday, offering the first glimpse of how the pandemic affected student learning. 

Compared with 2019, the last time tests were administered normally, reading proficiency among students in grades 3-8 ticked up 1.6 percentage points to 49%. But math scores plunged 7.6 percentage points, with just shy of 38% of students passing the exam. (Here’s Chalkbeat’s detailed story on those scores.)

But those overall numbers mask important variations from school to school, which often vary in predictable ways. A relatively large swath of city schools admit students based on their prior academic performance, often leading to high test scores, while schools that serve larger shares of low-income students are more likely to post lower scores.

How did your school fare this year? Use our searchable database below to see your school’s math and reading scores.

The Latest
With union bargaining heating up from Montefiore to Mount Sinai, clinicians say their pleas for more personnel are going dangerously unaddressed.
Independent Budget Office finds 10% fewer tax filers earned above $750K in the pandemic’s first year.
Without flood-protected chargers, the study says the MTA could lose $945,000 per day from loss of service on the B32 bus and another $10.4 million per day from the M42 bus crossing Manhattan from West 42nd to East 41st Street.
The reasons for enrollment declines are complex, and appear to include the lure of new school construction on one hand, and the high cost of living on the other.
Campaign finance scheme first exposed by THE CITY wasn’t enough for prosecutors to bring fraud or graft charges against the former lieutenant governor, judge rules.